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what iso should i set my light meter too?


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#1 Stewart Munro

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:05 AM

hey guys im new to shoting super 8mm and im shooting with ektachrome 64t color reversal film and im not sure what iso to shoot on when i set my minolta light meter?please help!!!
ps im shootting out doors
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:37 AM

First of all buy this asap!

FILM LIGHTING

That being said, if you are shooting in Tungsten Light (3200k), the manufacturer recommends you rate it at 64... hence 64t. If you are shooting in daylight (5500k) you will need to use an 85 filter if you want the image to look 'normal'... thus you will have to open (lower the iso) 2/3 of a stop to accommodate the 85... by rating the 64t (with an 85 in front of the lens) at 40.... Of course you could just add the 85 at the time of your film to tape or data Transfer.....

Get the book.. it is more involved than my three sentence explanation.
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#3 Stewart Munro

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:54 AM

First of all buy this asap!

FILM LIGHTING

That being said, if you are shooting in Tungsten Light (3200k), the manufacturer recommends you rate it at 64... hence 64t. If you are shooting in daylight (5500k) you will need to use an 85 filter if you want the image to look 'normal'... thus you will have to open (lower the iso) 2/3 of a stop to accommodate the 85... by rating the 64t (with an 85 in front of the lens) at 40. of course you could just add the 85 at the time of your film to tape or data Transfer.....

Get the book.. it is more involved than my three sentence explanation.



hey mate thanks for writing back!but im still not 100% what you put in to my light meter!i am shooting outside on a sunnday so does that mean i should set the ISO at 500?
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:04 PM

hey mate thanks for writing back!but im still not 100% what you put in to my light meter!i am shooting outside on a sunnday so does that mean i should set the ISO at 500?


Where did you get 500? I think you need a basic understanding of film and how it is rated before you go expose any and likely waste money.
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#5 Stewart Munro

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:24 PM

Where did you get 500? I think you need a basic understanding of film and how it is rated before you go expose any and likely waste money.



i have shoot 16mm before and it all came out fine!i just forgot what ISO to set my light meter for when i shot on super 8mm!
i have not uses the camera in 2 years so there is no need to be rude too me!Also thanks for bring nothing helpful to this post!
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#6 Stewart Munro

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:53 PM

First of all buy this asap!

FILM LIGHTING

That being said, if you are shooting in Tungsten Light (3200k), the manufacturer recommends you rate it at 64... hence 64t. If you are shooting in daylight (5500k) you will need to use an 85 filter if you want the image to look 'normal'... thus you will have to open (lower the iso) 2/3 of a stop to accommodate the 85... by rating the 64t (with an 85 in front of the lens) at 40. of course you could just add the 85 at the time of your film to tape or data Transfer.....

Get the book.. it is more involved than my three sentence explanation.



Hey David iso what your saying if i shooting out side i should set my ISO at 85?I looked on my light meter and it only has 80,Its is ok to shot it at that?
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#7 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 02:33 PM

I think you should reread what Mr. Keth wrote. He is correct. The fact that you write as if 8mm is different than 16 mm even though they are cut from the same sheet of emulsion demonstrates you have a lot to learn. I don't mean to be rude (nor did Mr. Keth I am sure). You can learn most everything essential in a couple passes through that Book.

To figure your iso:

Question #1. What Filters does your camera have available?

... that will be a large factor in deciding your asa/ iso rating.
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#8 Bruce Greene

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 02:42 PM

Hey David iso what your saying if i shooting out side i should set my ISO at 85?I looked on my light meter and it only has 80,Its is ok to shot it at that?


"85" is the name of the orange filter you must use to shoot 64T film in sunlight. This filter is often built into super 8 cameras and might be put in place by setting your camera to the picture of the sun on a switch. "64T" stands for "ISO 64 - tungsten (lightbulb) light.

So as david said, for outside make sure you add the "No. 85" (orange) filter, either on the front of the lens or use one built into the camera if it has one. Since the 85 filter absorbs 2/3 of one f-stop, you must expose as if the film is 2/3 f-stop less sensitive to light which will be ISO 40 on your minolta light meter.

If you can't understand this post, then you will need to study basic photography. A little blunt, but I hope not rude:)

Edited by Bruce Greene, 28 September 2009 - 02:46 PM.

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#9 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:19 PM

Bruce, please forgive me, I know you did not mean it this way, so I just wanted to clarify, using an 85 on Tungsten Stock shot outdoors is not a 'must'.... as there are Artistic as well as Post choices that can affect whether one is used on a T rated Stock whether it be in front of the lens, behind the lens, at the Transfer... or not at all....
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#10 Chris Keth

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:30 PM

I didn't at all mean to be rude. I meant to save you money.

The ISO you set on a meter depends on a lot of things and the format of the film is not one of them. Every film has a box speed. In your case it is 64 for tungsten balanced light. You'll get a fine picture if you set your ISO to match that. In your case, you will be shooting a tungsten stock outdoors so you'll be using an 85 filter to keep the color balance correct. You need to compensate for that filter and lower your meter ISO by 2/3 of a stop, making the new rated speed w/ 85 filter 40 ISO.

Alternately, you could choose not to correct the light balance and shoot the film at 64 ISO outdoors with no filter. Then, the color balance can be corrected when you have the film scanned. This will obviously not work if you intend to skip the scanning step and project your film directly. The image will be very blue.

Since you're shooting reversal stock, you may want to underexpose slightly. It makes for slightly denser nicer looking film.

If anything I just said does not make sense, I still recommend that you do some reading before you expose any film. Shooting lots of film is the best education, but only if you understand what is going on and are able to control it.
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#11 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:38 PM

.... and an even more important question is... "what do you want your Image to look like"?

That should be question #1...
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#12 Chris Keth

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:08 PM

.... and an even more important question is... "what do you want your Image to look like".

That should be question #1...


Absolutely! I feel that the hurdle of achieving a technically good image should be conquered first, though. Once that is well understood I think that achieving your aesthetic goals is easier because you're not still fighting with basic technicalities.
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#13 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:42 PM

btw.. what are you setting your 'Shutter Speed' to?... as that is the other half of the Meter equation.....
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#14 Bruce Greene

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 01:10 AM

Bruce, please forgive me, I know you did not mean it this way, so I just wanted to clarify, using an 85 on Tungsten Stock shot outdoors is not a 'must'.... as there are Artistic as well as Post choices that can affect whether one is used on a T rated Stock whether it be in front of the lens, behind the lens, at the Transfer... or not at all....


David, of course you are forgiven, but I assume Stuart is looking for a normal color rendition rather than a deep blue look. When shooting color reversal, color balance is more critical than shooting with negative film. Also, if I remember from (gulp, the 1970's), tungsten balanced film was the "standard" for super 8 cameras as all home movie lights were tungsten. The cameras generally had a built in 85 filter for shooting daylight with the same film.

And beside, poor Stuart was confused enough. You want to give him more choices? I don't think that will help him.

And lastly David, I very, very, rarely shoot tungsten negative film in daylight without the correction filter. :P
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#15 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 05:31 AM

I'm just gonna assume he's going without filters. And since 64T film is reversal, you should just set your light meter to ISO 64 to really nail the exposure correctly.
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#16 David Rakoczy

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 06:05 AM

And lastly David, I very, very, rarely shoot tungsten negative film in daylight without the correction filter. :P


Well... it is done everyday :P and it doesn't have to be deep blue.. just add the 85 in the Transfer... tho like you, I almost always use an 85 of sort....

If Stewart gets back to us regarding what Filters are on his Camera... we can let him know a 'safe' asa/ iso setting...

Until then...........
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#17 Tom Hepburn

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 08:48 AM

I wonder if I could get some clarification gentleman? I have yet to shoot tungsten balanced film outside, but I did buy a filer last year that was an 85B with the (mis)understanding that this (85B) is the right filter to balance tungsten film to daylight (5500 to 3200). Is that not the case?


Thanks,
Tom
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#18 Tom Jensen

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 09:44 AM

I wonder if I could get some clarification gentleman? I have yet to shoot tungsten balanced film outside, but I did buy a filer last year that was an 85B with the (mis)understanding that this (85B) is the right filter to balance tungsten film to daylight (5500 to 3200). Is that not the case?


Thanks,
Tom


You're fine. An 85 converts 5500 to 3400 which is only slightly cooler.

I suggest that it is always better to learn the rules and then learn how to break them. Many schools still project super 8 and do not telecine the film where the color corrections can be made. If the teacher projects the film and it is blue, he may ask, "Why wasn't this filtered?" I'm from the school that believes you should get exposure and color on the film the way you want it or as close as you can. As far as reversal film goes, I have never really had much luck under exposing it. I usually rated it at the manufacturers suggested ISO/ASA. Negative is much more forgiving and reversal needs to be exposed exactly. I love the look of reversal, however, it does not transfer as well as negative. We shoot negative for a reason.
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#19 Cameron Glendinning

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 03:39 AM

I agree that slightly underexposed can provides better results with reversal stocks, less grain and more headroom for highlights. Obviously you are only just erring under perhaps say 1/3 of a stop. Too much and the image will be milky looking.
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#20 Stewart Munro

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 11:20 AM

hey guys i want to say thanks for all the help!
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