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#1 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 11:26 AM

How long does Film usually last before it expires? Is it still wise to shoot on a two year old 16mm raw stock?

Thank You
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 01:34 PM

Nice title, er not. . .

Unless you had the film in your glove compartment or in a window for those two years, you'll be perfectly fine.
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 02:40 PM

It's probably OK. You could pick the easiest, least important thing in your show, maybe establishing shots, car by's, etc, and shoot that first. It's a test that produces something you can use if the stock is OK.




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#4 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 03:20 PM

I've shot stock that was older than that and it was fine. Would say to test some before you use it for anything important (if you have a large vloume of it)
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#5 Dominic Case

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 06:42 PM

How long does Film usually last before it expires?

Depends on several factors.

  • If it's high speed stock, it will show age fogging sooner than a fine grain slow stock.
  • If you keep it refrigerated, it will last longer.
  • If it goes from hot to cold to hot to cold, it will show age sooner than if it was at a stable temperature.
  • And a little age fog might ruin some shots (that depend on subtle shadow detail for example), but be hardly noticeable in others.
Two years for a medium speed stock at room temperature could be OK. Or for a refrigerated high speed stock.

The universal answer has been given already: TEST!
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#6 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 07:35 PM

bring it to the lab, ask them to make an sensitometric test (they´ll cut a couple of frames of your roll) and they would tell you the condition of your stock. yo might have to overexpose a little bit to reduce grain and get some contrast.

Depends on several factors.

  • If it's high speed stock, it will show age fogging sooner than a fine grain slow stock.
  • If you keep it refrigerated, it will last longer.
  • If it goes from hot to cold to hot to cold, it will show age sooner than if it was at a stable temperature.
  • And a little age fog might ruin some shots (that depend on subtle shadow detail for example), but be hardly noticeable in others.
Two years for a medium speed stock at room temperature could be OK. Or for a refrigerated high speed stock.

The universal answer has been given already: TEST!


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#7 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 10:30 PM

bring it to the lab, ask them to make an sensitometric test (they´ll cut a couple of frames of your roll) and they would tell you the condition of your stock. yo might have to overexpose a little bit to reduce grain and get some contrast.



but ya thanks guys , It was 4 cans of 200T vision 2 , and 1 can of 500T Expression . The man said he had them kept in the fridge for 18 months. So I'm guessing they work. But I'll take them down to Kodak in a Cooler next weekend. I would'nt mind grain. I'm shooting my Portfolio in like 6 months ( I know it's early but IM EXCITED!) and I'm trying to recreate that 80's look to create a Mafioso (MIAMI/Cartel/GTA:Vice city) Red Light Distric look etcc.... "ShYou talking to me Tommy?"
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 05:48 AM

But I'll take them down to Kodak in a Cooler next weekend.


Kodak doesn't do tests for you, unless you are talking about one of their labs.

And keeping them cold-stored during transport is silly, just like refrigerated transport of beer.
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#9 Serge Teulon

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 06:19 AM

Hey Geovanne,

When I read the title of your post I had to fight myself to come in and have a look.

I've had film stock in my fridge for 2 years....shot with it and it was completely fine. Now, if that is what you call flimsy, then I don't know what to say.
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#10 K Borowski

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 08:12 AM

Now, if that is what you call flimsy, then I don't know what to say.


Doesn't he say "filmsy" as in "film-like"?


I'd say, now that Geovane has identified the stock and storage conditions (unless the person he got it from lied, of course), that he is fine shooting it without tests.

I *would* call up Kodak, read them off some numbers to ascertain that it is only two years old, but two years, with proper storage is well within the "expiration date" that I'd expect from even a 500-speed film stock, unless he is using a specialized application, like a push process, with the 500T.
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#11 Serge Teulon

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 12:59 PM

Doesn't he say "filmsy" as in "film-like"?



Indeed he does.....my dyslexia plays havoc with me sometimes.
I take it back Geovanne ;)

I retire with my tail firmly between my legs
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#12 Geovane Marquez

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 02:02 PM

Indeed he does.....my dyslexia plays havoc with me sometimes.
I take it back Geovanne ;)

I retire with my tail firmly between my legs


I think I have dyslexia now!
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#13 Tebbe Schoeningh

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:12 PM

Geovanne, Karl is right. It´s unnecessary to use a cooler to bring the cans to a lab. Unless you live in a very hot place. If that´s the case, I would recommend to take the cans out of the fridge and put them into te cooler to let them "heat up" slowly. Worse than a couple of hours at higher temperatures is the inmediate change of temperature.

If you´re going to shoot in low light conditions its even more important that you take the raw-stock to the lab! 16mm can get really grainy, even more if your stock isn´t in perfect condition and if you´re underexposing it.

good luck!
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#14 Serge Teulon

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 06:49 AM

I think I have dyslexia now!



You don't catch it like the flu!
It is something that sometimes can be quite a hindrance. Which means that you have to work twice as hard....

Edited by Serge Teulon, 01 October 2009 - 06:51 AM.

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