Jump to content


Photo

Film Workflow


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Steve McBride

Steve McBride
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 239 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • New York, NY

Posted 03 October 2009 - 10:33 AM

I'm currently a student and learning 16mm filming, and I was just wondering the full workflow for film.

Right now, all we're doing is getting a 100ft 16mm daylight roll from the school and shoot on it and turn it into the lab guy who sends it out and gets it back and then the editing lab at the school does a (really bad) "telecine" transfer. I get that that is the basic workflow for film, but I was wondering if someone could just layout the entire workflow from getting the film to actually making the print to be projected on screen.

Thanks!
  • 1

#2 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11944 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 October 2009 - 11:46 AM

This sounds enormously like a homework question, but here goes anyway. Since this is a cinematography forum, I'll omit discussion of sound and also intricacies like titles, effects and colour timing which can be done in a variety of ways.

Traditional workflow:

Shoot and process negative
Make workprint
Cut workprint
Cut negative to match workprint
Make interpositive from cut neg
Make internegative from interpositive
Make prints from internegative.

More recent workflow:

Shoot and process negative
Make video transfer
Edit video transfer
Cut negative to match video
Make interpositive from cut neg
Make internegative from interpositive
Make prints from internegative.

Most recent and current workflow:

Shoot and process negative
Make video transfer
Edit video transfer
High-resolution scan of selects
Electronically assemble finished movie
Record finished movie out to film
Make duplicates, either having made an interpos and interneg from the recorded output or, more rarely, having recorded multiple negatives.

K?
  • 1

#3 Steve McBride

Steve McBride
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 239 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • New York, NY

Posted 03 October 2009 - 12:55 PM

Thanks a lot for the response. And no, it's not a homework question. My school is more focused on actually shooting projects so I don't have (traditional) homework. Lectures, workshops, and shooting only. And I've been around here long enough that I would feel weird asking professionals to do my homework for me.

Edited by Steve McBride, 03 October 2009 - 12:59 PM.

  • 0

#4 Nick Hemphill

Nick Hemphill

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Student
  • New York

Posted 10 October 2009 - 09:34 PM

I was talking to a fellow student and he said that at his school they would record the projected reel on HD cameras. Easy to do. Maybe better than the telecine transfer.
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11944 posts
  • Other

Posted 10 October 2009 - 09:58 PM

Pointing a camera at a projected image is generally referred to as a film chain, and usually produces results considerably inferior to a telecine.

P
  • 0

#6 David Regan

David Regan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 218 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • New York

Posted 12 October 2009 - 10:12 AM

Dominic Case, a regular contributor on here, has a a book: "Film Technology in post production" which I found quite helpful back when I was first trying to figure out workflows.
  • 0

#7 Dominic Case

Dominic Case
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1357 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney Australia

Posted 13 October 2009 - 05:09 PM

Thanks for the recommendation, David. The book is still available, and selling steadily, though I suspect there are still a few members of this list who haven't got it ;)

Phil's otherwise excellent workflows did leave out a small stage or two in the traditional film flows: after cutting the negative to match work print (or to match digital edit via edl), the neg is colour graded (timed) and an answer print is made for approval. Only after this approval is the interpos made.

Similarly in the third model (DI), after "electronically assemble finished movie" there is the colour correction stage.

It's worth mentioning these stages as colour correction / grading / timing is something the cinematographer wants to be involved in wherever possible.
  • 0


Metropolis Post

CineTape

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

The Slider

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Opal

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Glidecam

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera