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Loading Magazine with fresh film


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#1 Bill Munns

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 05:20 PM

If a person wanted to tesy a 16mm magazine-type camera, taking a 50' load of film, does anyone know if any film supplier in the USA will load fresh film stock into such magazines, and after you film with it, they can unload and process the footage?

Or is this something the cameraman must learn to do himself, and buy 100' loads of fresh film, and load the magazine himself (in a black bag or darkroom), and unload it to a film can to be sent to a lab?

Just curious if anyone films with old magazine type camera today and has any experience in this subject.

Thanks

Bill
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 06:06 PM

If a person wanted to tesy a 16mm magazine-type camera, taking a 50' load of film, does anyone know if any film supplier in the USA will load fresh film stock into such magazines, and after you film with it, they can unload and process the footage?

Or is this something the cameraman must learn to do himself, and buy 100' loads of fresh film, and load the magazine himself (in a black bag or darkroom), and unload it to a film can to be sent to a lab?

Just curious if anyone films with old magazine type camera today and has any experience in this subject.

Thanks

Bill


Most film cameras, not just old ones, use some type of magazine to hold the film. Loading and unloading these is normally something the cameraman or a camera assistant does in a changing tent or darkroom.
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#3 Bill Munns

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 06:42 PM

Most film cameras, not just old ones, use some type of magazine to hold the film. Loading and unloading these is normally something the cameraman or a camera assistant does in a changing tent or darkroom.



I'm speaking specifically of the 50' magazines which, in olden days, Kodak loaded and unloaded, and the cameraman never did.

I am aware of what you are referring to, having operated Arriflex's and Eclain NPR's and loaded those magazines with 200', and 400' loads (in black bags).

But the 50' magazine is a vary different type. Charlie Plech was kind enough to supply me with some old loading notes, and both a Kodak and a Ansco magazine, but I don't currently have the darkroom to load and unload (plus learning how), so I am curious if any lab or film supplied does offer services for loading the 50' magazine, as Kodak used to do.

I might add the cameras I will be testing are a Cine-Kodak, and a Bell & Howell, both which take the standard 50' magazine type load.

Bill

Edited by Bill Munns, 03 October 2009 - 06:43 PM.

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#4 Tom Jensen

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 11:13 PM

I think they did that at one time but it's just not done any more.
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 11:38 PM

Oh, those magazines. :lol: I don't think that any kind of 50 foot loads are available anymore. They would have to be downspooled from longer lengths. They would probably need 2R and I don't know the availability of that now. Maybe special order.

Do you know what kind of spools were used or are they proprietary to the type of camera?

I would try posting about this is the "films and processing" forum. There are some lab guys who read there regularly and some of them may know if this service is still offered anywhere.
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 October 2009 - 09:16 PM

Oh, those magazines. :lol:
Do you know what kind of spools were used or are they proprietary to the type of camera?


The old 50 foot mags use a special small core. The film is double perf and if I remember correctly is wound emulsion out. One shot, you would have to either re-spool the film a second time or have an assurance from the lab that they would return the core.

Java Photo on e-bay occasionally lists some government surplus Plus-x magazines from the collection he has in his freezer, which may be the easiest way of playing with one of those old cameras. Your lab may be willing to remove the film and return the empty mag with all its small parts.

The mags were made to use double perf and they have a double perf sprocket inside. The film touches the sprocket twice and at one point is in a double layer, so I am not sure of the film would run true of the magazine were to be modified for single perf.
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#7 Patrick Neary

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Posted 05 October 2009 - 09:42 AM

here you go:

http://www.alangordo...cam16_mags.html

spendy though!
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#8 Bill Munns

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Posted 05 October 2009 - 01:56 PM

Patrick:

Thank you.

Alan Gordon is local for me, so that works perfectly.

I opened a magazine I had, and looked at the threading configuration, and it's quite intricate. If I had to learn it myself, it would be a long learning curve.

Gordon recommends Fotochem as the processor, and they are local as well.

The information is greatly appreciated.

Bill
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Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC