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New Paramount Pictures movie Paranormal Activity


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#1 Ronney Ross

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 07:46 PM

I Just heard about this film what Im syked about is it was made for $11grand and sold at the film fest to Paramount
heres the trailer:

http://www.dreamlogi...review-screener
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 07:09 PM

I Just heard about this film what Im syked about is it was made for $11grand and sold at the film fest to Paramount
heres the trailer:

http://www.dreamlogi...review-screener


I congratulate the filmmaker and I hope to see this.

The downside is that stories like this only serve to fuel the idea that you can make a movie for 11K and sell it to a major studio. It won't be long before people on this very board, site the low cost of this movie as proof that you can make a movie for this little and get it into theaters.

What they forget about are the thousands of un-sold movies out there, and that movies like Blairwitch and Paranormal Activity have zero statistical relevance.

R,
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#3 Justin Hayward

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 10:34 PM

The downside is that stories like this only serve to fuel the idea that you can make a movie for 11K and sell it to a major studio. It won't be long before people on this very board, site the low cost of this movie as proof that you can make a movie for this little and get it into theaters.


Let’s look at the glass half full – maybe this will encourage filmmakers to get more creative!

Who cares about what people post on forums, right? What difference does that make other than annoy two or tree people? I want to see more inspired films.
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#4 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 12:01 AM

Let’s look at the glass half full – maybe this will encourage filmmakers to get more creative!


Ah excuse me....but if that happened there would be fewer TV shows from the 60s & 70s turned into feature films!

Where would we be without feature length versions of, The Dukes Of Hazard, The Beverly Hillbillies, or Starsky and Hutch?

I am personally working on my big screen adaptations of Gilligan's Island and Hogan's Heros.

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#5 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 12:02 AM

I kinda feel like half the fun and magic of a movie is missing when they use the "amateur video" plot device. But then again it got this director's foot in the door so who am i to judge?! For my money, i'd rather see pi, primer, clerks, el mariachi or any indie film that doesn't pretend to be home video footage.

It did get me thinking, though, how far this genre might go. Reality TV is a significant percentage of show on the air these days. i started thinking about some good movies i've seen recently and wondered how they may have looked had they been shot "blair witch" style? obviously it imposes a lot of limitations but i suppose a great story can be told all kinds of ways.
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#6 Richard Vialet

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 02:56 AM

Just got in from seeing this. It truly terrified me. TRULY. It was the first time I've ever trembled and shivered in the theatre. I knew nothing about it other than it had a blair witch style and it had a demon. I hadnt even seen the trailer. Now im on the phone with my girlfriend , with all the lights on to distract me.

I don't even wanna say much. Just know that this forum reader and the whole audience he was with was terrified and you should see it.
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 10:44 AM

Just got in from seeing this. It truly terrified me. TRULY. It was the first time I've ever trembled and shivered in the theatre. I knew nothing about it other than it had a blair witch style and it had a demon. I hadnt even seen the trailer. Now im on the phone with my girlfriend , with all the lights on to distract me.

I don't even wanna say much. Just know that this forum reader and the whole audience he was with was terrified and you should see it.


Sounds like the $11 grand wasn't it's only point. I guess I'll go see it, now.
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#8 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 09:51 PM

It just made roughly $20 million in its opening weekend. The trailer does look scary.
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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:28 PM

It just made roughly $20 million in its opening weekend. The trailer does look scary.


I hope the creator got a back end deal!!

R,
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 02:38 AM

I Just heard about this film what Im syked about is it was made for $11grand and sold at the film fest to Paramount
heres the trailer:

http://www.dreamlogi...review-screener


There's a lot of films that made a lot of money that cost little to make Blood Guts Bullets and Obtain est. 7K El Mariachi est. 7k The Blair Witch project Est. 22K, Halloween est. 320K, Night of the living Dead est. 114K, Psycho est. 807K, easy rider 400K, Texas Chainsaw Massacre est. 140K, The Puffy Chair 15K, Clerks est. 27K, Slacker est 23K, The Brothers McMullen est 25K, Last House on the Left est. 87K, Rocky est 150K, Pi est 60K, Monty Python and the Holy Grail est 250K, A Fist Full of Dollars est. 200K, Mad Max est. 400K, evil Dead est. 375K, Primer est. 7K, Pink Flamingos est. 12K, Faster Pussy Cat! Kill! Kill! est 45K, She’s Gotta Have it est. 175K, In the Company of Men est. 25K, Killer's Kiss, est. 40K, Swingers est. 250K, Bad Taste est 25K, Open Water est. 130K, Run Lola Run est 175K, Blood Feast est 25K, Sweet Sweetback Baadassss' Song est. 50K, Mean Streets est 300K and on and on. Like William Goldman once said Nobody knows anything. All you can do is make the best movie you can with the money you have and hope it grows legs. The sweet spot for indy films is 1.2 to 2 mil. That budget range statistically has the best cost to profit ratio. If I HAD to make a film on an 11K budget, I'd do it, but I sure as Hell would prefer not to be that short.
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#11 Tom Lowe

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 08:52 AM

The hype advertising alone on this movie is making me not want to see it.
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#12 Richard Boddington

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 10:33 AM

The sweet spot for indy films is 1.2 to 2 mil.


That is still a butt load of money to get back. Imagine a direct to DVD movie with a budget of 1.2, how many DVDs would you have to sell to make back 1.2? DVD is say $19.95, then deduct the retailers percentage, the distributors percentage, replication costs, shipping, packaging, and pretty soon you realize you need to sell a mega load of DVDs to make back "just" 1.2 million.

By the time the studio is done deducting their "costs" for getting Paranormal Activity out there the 11K movie that made 30 million will generate a cheque for the filmmaker of $13.27 :D

R,
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#13 Justin Hayward

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 10:56 AM

That is still a butt load of money to get back.


I once looked up the winners of the Sundance Film Festival of the past ten years or so to see how much they made vs. how much they cost. It was depressing.
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#14 Richard Boddington

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 11:30 AM

Apparently....."Where The Wild Things Are" cost 80 million, and brought in 32 million over the first weekend. Great start, but you do the math and you realize that film has a long way to go to break even.

First, that 32 million is gross ticket sales, the studio must share a chunk of that money with the theater owners of course, 30-40% of each ticket? They never reveal the exact percentages.

Next, the studio must deduct the P&A costs. And considering the ad campaign for this movie and the number of screens it opened on, the P&A budget was pretty huge. This number is also never given out by the studios.

So that first 32 million will have been whittled down quite a bit. I'm sure it will make money at some point, especially with overseas revenue, DVD, and TV sales. But it just goes to demonstrate how successful big movies must be in order to turn a profit.

The public only hears 80 million cost vs 32 million in the opening weekend, and they think, wow they made almost half their money back already. This is far from the case.

If I had 80 million laying around would I blow it all on a movie. YES, absolutely, you only live once so why not? ;)

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#15 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 02:45 AM

That is still a butt load of money to get back. Imagine a direct to DVD movie with a budget of 1.2, how many DVDs would you have to sell to make back 1.2? DVD is say $19.95, then deduct the retailers percentage, the distributors percentage, replication costs, shipping, packaging, and pretty soon you realize you need to sell a mega load of DVDs to make back "just" 1.2 million.

By the time the studio is done deducting their "costs" for getting Paranormal Activity out there the 11K movie that made 30 million will generate a cheque for the filmmaker of $13.27 :D

R,


Yeah, straight to video, you're screwed. At that budget, you would probably break even or make a little bit, assuming you got distribution. Now with even a limited theatrical release, you're looking at a return on average of 950%,, foreign markets making up about 65% of that which are much more difficult to get with out a theatrical release as you found out on Dark Reprieve. It was only after your brilliant marketing strategy of targeting smaller digital theaters and the 50/50 split deals you made for theatrical exhibition that you were able to attract US video distribution. Now out of that 950% expenses, payments ect. would be taken but you'd still come out pretty well as I suspect you are about to find out with Dogfather. if your deal included back end points. Though, not a Horror film, it does have a decent cast and should have wide appeal. Of course if you had taken all the money spent on making movies last year and put it in the bank, the film industry as a whole would have made more money from the interest than it did from selling films......but where's the glamour in that? B) BTW, if these are first-time film makers without a lot of business experience I think $13.27 return for the film makers might be a bit optimistic. :D
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#16 Richard Boddington

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 11:46 AM

but where's the glamour in that?


Exactly. You can't take it with you, besides, I want to work until I'm 87.

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#17 Paul Bruening

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 09:51 PM

Here's what Coppala says about the biz:

http://www.bloomberg...id=ajbmamDBit14
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#18 Richard Boddington

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 12:05 AM

"While the Godfather films scooped Oscars, he still has challenges in getting sponsors for some projects. He financed “Tetro” with revenue from his vineyard in California."

Yep, even the Oscar winners can have a tough road when it comes to film financing.

R,
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#19 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 01:37 AM

Exactly. You can't take it with you, besides, I want to work until I'm 87.

R,


I personally want to keep going till I'm 102 ljust so I can beat Manoel de Oliveira, the oldest movie director in history.



This guy is my new hero!! B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 21 October 2009 - 01:38 AM.

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#20 Paul Bruening

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 11:29 AM

"While the Godfather films scooped Oscars, he still has challenges in getting sponsors for some projects. He financed “Tetro” with revenue from his vineyard in California."

Yep, even the Oscar winners can have a tough road when it comes to film financing.

R,


Richard, how is the market changing? Usually, we take it from either the making end or the consuming end to try to get a bead on it. Recently, I've tried to take other perspectives. With movies like A Sensible Man and Hurt Locker in limited release we may see a decrease of the stranglehold of the standard, screen distribution model. Could your movie have benefited from a top 20 USA release? You see, right now at my local Malco, they're sitting on movies some of which they've had for well over a month.

What if you took the last numbers from your first feature. What would those numbers tell you was your general budget cap on the next feature?
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