Jump to content


Photo

Los Angeles Filmschools


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Paul Rugzo

Paul Rugzo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 12 October 2009 - 10:39 AM

Hello everybody,

I am new on this forum, so I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question.

Currently I am a filmstudent studying on the Nation Film Academy in Amsterdam (Netherlands).
We shoot on professional formats (16mm, 35mm, XDCAM HD). When I'm finished (in two years from now) I would like to study one or two more years in Los Angeles and eventually start to work there as a Cinematographer.
Offcourse I understand that I won't become a DoP the first (let's say) 4 years. I understand that.

In The Netherlands we only have one professional filmschool, where I'm at right now. Only 7 people out of 200 are accepted for the alignment "Camera" each year. And are highly educated.
What I am looking for is a study compared to mine. I want ask if anybody knows what the best/most professional filmschool are in Los Angeles. I have searched on the internet and have found only two.

1.
The Dodge College of Film and Media Arts - http://ftv.chapman.edu/

2.
The Film Connection - http://www.filmconnection.com/
Last one isn't a real school.

Does anybody know whether these schools are professional and will give you the opportunity to meet the "right people" in the business? Maby anybody know's a school where you can only study Cinematography?

Thank you very much.

Regards,
Paul
  • 0

#2 Sean Ryan Finnegan

Sean Ryan Finnegan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 October 2009 - 03:25 AM

Hello everybody,

I am new on this forum, so I don't know if this is the right place to ask this question.

Currently I am a filmstudent studying on the Nation Film Academy in Amsterdam (Netherlands).
We shoot on professional formats (16mm, 35mm, XDCAM HD). When I'm finished (in two years from now) I would like to study one or two more years in Los Angeles and eventually start to work there as a Cinematographer.
Offcourse I understand that I won't become a DoP the first (let's say) 4 years. I understand that.

In The Netherlands we only have one professional filmschool, where I'm at right now. Only 7 people out of 200 are accepted for the alignment "Camera" each year. And are highly educated.
What I am looking for is a study compared to mine. I want ask if anybody knows what the best/most professional filmschool are in Los Angeles. I have searched on the internet and have found only two.

1.
The Dodge College of Film and Media Arts - http://ftv.chapman.edu/

2.
The Film Connection - http://www.filmconnection.com/
Last one isn't a real school.

Does anybody know whether these schools are professional and will give you the opportunity to meet the "right people" in the business? Maby anybody know's a school where you can only study Cinematography?

Thank you very much.

Regards,
Paul


Most film schools offer cinematography as an area of study, but not solely. They'll usually have specializations in directing, editing, production design, producing, and screenwriting. Though it is always difficult to come up with a list of the best institutions/schools for film since the criteria for what constitutes a good film school is always changing, you'll often see University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), Chapman University, Loyola Marymount University (LMU), University of Texas at Austin (UTA), American Film Institute (AFI), New York University (NYU) and Columbia University.

It has to be said: there is a lot of debate about whether these schools/institutions really create good filmmakers. There's no doubt that in the past some amazing filmmakers have graduated from these programs, and of course, there's no doubt that some current students at those schools will go on to be successful, but the debate is more along the lines of whether or not these schools offer something that can't be learned otherwise. Anything you learn in these institutions can easily be learned on set, or in a book. It all comes down to how you prefer to learn.
  • 0

#3 Jim Carlile

Jim Carlile
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 October 2009 - 08:16 PM

With your background, try applying to AFI.

Where you are going now sounds immensely better than anything else in LA-- but be sure you finish first.

You might be disappointed in the --ahem-- intellectual level in America, compared to what you are used to. It's nonexistent, really.
  • 0

#4 Paul Rugzo

Paul Rugzo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 November 2009 - 09:10 AM

With your background, try applying to AFI.

Where you are going now sounds immensely better than anything else in LA-- but be sure you finish first.

You might be disappointed in the --ahem-- intellectual level in America, compared to what you are used to. It's nonexistent, really.


What do you mean 'Intellectual level'? Why is the AFI the best for me?
I think I learn a lot here at the academy, but because the industry in the Netherlands is very small the possibily to grow is minimum. That's why I would like to go to LA.

Ps. The most expensive picture every made in The Netherlands is... 14 MIL EURO (20 MIL DOLLAR). You get the picture ;)

Any students here on the UCLA or AFI??
  • 0

#5 Jim Carlile

Jim Carlile
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 09 November 2009 - 01:36 AM

I think with your background you would be very disappointed in what most L.A. film schools have to offer. True there is more industry here, but it sounds like your curriculum and fellow film students are far more sophisticated and better-read than what you will ever find in America.

The only exception might be AFI. If you want to come to California and study, that would be the best bet for you. But it's very competitive. And get your European degree first.

The second choice would be UCLA or USC graduate schools-- the MFA programs. But even there you might find that you outrank the other students.

If you are going to a highly selective European school then you're way beyond most Americans. For instance, American students grow up with things called "multiple choice tests," which get a big laugh from every European I've known. And don't knock 20-million dollar budgets, either. Enjoy your time as a film student in a great school in a great city.
  • 0

#6 Paul Rugzo

Paul Rugzo

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:27 AM

I think with your background you would be very disappointed in what most L.A. film schools have to offer. True there is more industry here, but it sounds like your curriculum and fellow film students are far more sophisticated and better-read than what you will ever find in America.

The only exception might be AFI. If you want to come to California and study, that would be the best bet for you. But it's very competitive. And get your European degree first.

The second choice would be UCLA or USC graduate schools-- the MFA programs. But even there you might find that you outrank the other students.

If you are going to a highly selective European school then you're way beyond most Americans. For instance, American students grow up with things called "multiple choice tests," which get a big laugh from every European I've known. And don't knock 20-million dollar budgets, either. Enjoy your time as a film student in a great school in a great city.


How about New York Film Academy? Or any filmschool in NYC? Are there any great schools?? :unsure:
  • 0

#7 Brian Dzyak

Brian Dzyak
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1517 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Encino, California USA

Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:38 AM

You'll probably be disappointed by University level instruction in Cinematography here in the US, given your experience.

Perhaps you might find something you like. I'd suggest you take a look at the extensive list of schools at http://www.realfilmcareer.com (click on the Filmschools link at the top then navigate to the areas that interest you.) I'd suggest CONTACTING schools in Los Angeles, New York, North Carolina, and Florida. Research the schools there and then pick up the phone and talk to the Department heads about the specific curriculum they offer to find out if they have what you want and need.

Otherwise, you may find that you will get more out of less expensive and quicker lighting workshops which are usually taught by working professionals. IATSE Local 600 and rental houses, like Panavision, will have information about schedules and upcoming events.

As many others have and will tell you, you can generally get the information you need from published sources, like books and DVDs (many of which are listed on this forum), at a far lower cost than a school will offer. After that, it's all about just being out there on sets with equipment and crews and just lighting in a variety of situations. You'll find your own favorite methods and shortcuts along the way.

Good luck!
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Opal

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider