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Kodak Vision 2 HD (5299)


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#1 Fred Neilsen

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 05:04 AM

I was trying to find the dynamic range of kodak vision 2 and somehow stumbled across this,

http://motion.kodak...._Films/7299.htm

I assume that it isn't new as it is vision 2, but I've never heard of anyone using it. I'm curious as to what it is. Digital processing, Matching It's characteristics with other film stocks... (all sounds cool)

Has anyone used it, Do all labs process it, does it cost more

This is mainly to satisfy my curiossity but if you dont need to bulk order, I might buy 100' or 400' roll


Fred
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#2 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 02:08 PM

It is a low con high speed color negative film which is processed in standard ECN-2 chemistry. The "Digital Processor" is a dual link SDI box that is supposed to sit on the back of your telecine and apply "looks" that are pre built by Kodak. You can process and transfer this film just like any other color negative and I believe that at least one TV show has shot this with standard post i.e. without the Kodak box.

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#3 John Holland

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 03:36 PM

Yes its just another thing Kodak have done to make their stocks look like HD/Video they are really going big time down the toilet !!
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 15 October 2009 - 08:53 PM

It is a low con high speed color negative film which is processed in standard ECN-2 chemistry....You can process and transfer this film just like any other color negative


BUT the word is that it can ONLY be used with DI techniques. Apparently the masks will not work to make any sort of direct print.
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#5 James Compton

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 01:14 PM

BUT the word is that it can ONLY be used with DI techniques. Apparently the masks will not work to make any sort of direct print.


There are 2 TV shows that are shot on that film stock. Numbers(whicjh has switched to digital) and Desperate Housewives. You don't HAVE to used to KODAK Scanner/Sftware but it does proved a LUT with alot of old KODAK stocks like the EXR line. Here's a quote from ASC mag online :


http://www.theasc.co...ision/page3.php

"Desperate Housewives is shot on 35mm using Panaflex Platinum, Gold II and Millennium XL cameras and Primo lenses. It is framed for 4:3 and protected for 16:9 broadcast in high-definition. Peterson has used Kodak Vision2 HD Color Scan Film 5299 to film the show since the stock hit the market almost two years ago. “It’s basically [Vision2 500T] 5218 that has been optimized for telecine use,” he says. “It removes some of the color mask you don’t need for telecine, so it gives you more latitude.”
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#6 georg lamshöft

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 03:00 PM

"Bones" is also shot on it.

I think the main point is the missing color mask, it isn't optimized for daylight or tungsten.
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#7 Chris Burke

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 05:20 PM

I think that boston legal was shot on it as well.
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 05:40 PM

I've heard some pretty impressive things about this stocks latitude AND working EI range.

Granted some DPs like to exagerate, but I've heard about shooting it two stops under-exposed, I think without a push, and it still yielding good images.


"The Shield" was shot exclusively on this stock too, though it was a 16mm show.


With almost all movies being finished DI these days, this stock should be just as versatile for features. Seems like there are definite advantages, if you're working through the tape route anyway, to taking advantages of the added flexibilities of no colored mask.

Anyone know if there is any price difference between this and '18, '19, or '60? Seeing that it seems to be catered (at least originally) to lower budget TV shows, I wouldn't be surprised if it is cheaper to boot, but I haven't seen it advertised at all through the channels I normally use.
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#9 Chris Burke

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:51 PM

I've heard some pretty impressive things about this stocks latitude AND working EI range.

Granted some DPs like to exagerate, but I've heard about shooting it two stops under-exposed, I think without a push, and it still yielding good images.


"The Shield" was shot exclusively on this stock too, though it was a 16mm show.


With almost all movies being finished DI these days, this stock should be just as versatile for features. Seems like there are definite advantages, if you're working through the tape route anyway, to taking advantages of the added flexibilities of no colored mask.

Anyone know if there is any price difference between this and '18, '19, or '60? Seeing that it seems to be catered (at least originally) to lower budget TV shows, I wouldn't be surprised if it is cheaper to boot, but I haven't seen it advertised at all through the channels I normally use.


I think the Shield was shot first on 7274 then 7217. Since we can't get 7274 anymore or 7293 for that matter, shooting the 99 with the Kodak LUT for either stock sounds pretty good to me.
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#10 K Borowski

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Posted 17 October 2009 - 11:18 AM

I think the Shield was shot first on 7274 then 7217. Since we can't get 7274 anymore or 7293 for that matter, shooting the 99 with the Kodak LUT for either stock sounds pretty good to me.


Yeah, I think you are right about it being on '17, but according to one of the Kodak articles, it switched to '99 as its sole stock, supposedly for its flexibility.

So that isn't what I meant, that '99 is the closest we can get to the old look. Unless the show's DP was lying to the guy from Kodak that interviewed him, they were shooting all '99 for the last one or two seasons.
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#11 Fred Neilsen

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 01:47 AM

Sounds like an interesting stock. Seeing as I usualy only use one stock (even if shooting daylight and tungsten, I know, bad habit, fix it in TK... :angry: ) this seems like a viable choice. I could do with the greater dynamic range (after using digital for all my short films this year) I miss being able to see everything out of a window, and not being scared of shooting in a car. Thank you everyone for clarifying my confusions and helping me to understand what seems to be a great stock.

Fred
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