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Bauer s2035xl and Ektachrome 64T


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#1 steve dewar

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 01:01 PM

Hi

I just bought this, Bauer s2035XL my first 8mm camera at a low price, but I can find very little info on the net, and wondered if I could ask a question. Will this camera cope with Ektachrome 64T? According to the super wiki guide, cameras with a backlight compensation button need to follow a peculiar proceedure, which im struggling to understand:

http://super8wiki.co..._in_old_cameras

im acomplete novice at this, so any help anyone has in respect of knowlegde or experience of this camera would be appreciated. I have also bought two packs of the old Kodachrome 40 just to test it out when it arrives, and then once i understand the Ektachrome 64Tsetttings, compare and contrast. Finally can i assume that if I shoot at 24fps then for natural speed playback i need to watch it on a projector with the ability to switch to 24fps, sorry if im stating the obvious there, but as i live in the uk and we are pal at 25fps, after that, what settings do i give the telecine operator 24 or 25?
If it wasnt 25fps by the time it reached miniDV, I worried that my comp editing software (premiere Pro 2) might not work.

Im sorry if this isnt making complete sense. Im still reading and taking in at all at this stage.
Below is the description from the ebay seller i bought the camera from. I did find one shop selling it boasting about its low light capacity, due to the lens, but it might be just waffle, we'll soon see. Thanks guys.


Bauer s2035xl Super 8 camera dating from 1981

1, 18, 24fps filming speeds

Blacklight correction button

Manual aperture override

In good clean condition - camera very well looked after - superb cosmetic condition!

Lens is clear without fungus - comes with original Bauer Lens Hood and Lens Cap - has a 55mm filter thread.

Camera has been tested with a film cartridge loaded and the motor runs at all speeds and the lightmeter reacts accordingly and appears to give an accurate reading based on teh 40/160 asa filmspeeds.

Power Zoom works as does the manual zoom and macro focusing.

This camera was bought as a spare camera for a super 8 workshop I held and was never used apart from demonstration and some tests.

The rubber eyepiece is damaged (common problem for Bauer rubber eyepieces of this age) however it is possible to use the camera without.

additional info from super8arena.com:

XL means eXisting Light. That's all you'll need. An extra wide 220 degree shutter opening coupled with an ultra fast lens specially constructed for this Bauer camera, the NEOVARON brand. Combine it with high performance exposure metering and you have a camera that let you shoot in very bright light or even indoors. Dimly lit subjects can be shot naturally without any additional lighting or digital enhancements.
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#2 Max Smith

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 06:42 AM

Steve,

I've never used the camera in question - but it certainly looks like it is going to be confused by E64. You may be able to correct for it - if you can master setting the exposure manually - but it is tricky - and you need a good understanding of camera exposure to get it right.

My recommendation is to get a camera that can handle it automatically, and it'll probably be on ebay for less than the cost of a Super 8 cart.

Regarding 24fps versus 25fps. Shoot at 24fps, telecine at 25fps - it's what happens to all US films in Europe. The 4% speed-up is too slight for most people to notice.

You may get some flicker in the finished film with artificial lighting/TV screens - so be warned.

Max.
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#3 steve dewar

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 10:59 AM

Thanks for that Max. I know the camera isnt one of the better known ones, its due to get here in the next couple of days and ill be able to judge better. Im expecting the manual is in German which isnt much good, but im prepared to experiment with manual exposure anyway. I have two stocks of the old Kodachrome 40 also on the way, and depending on their condition that may provide a measuring tool, before i start with Ektachrome 64T and the other stocks. Thanks also for the telecine info.
Will update on the camera when I know more.











Steve,

I've never used the camera in question - but it certainly looks like it is going to be confused by E64. You may be able to correct for it - if you can master setting the exposure manually - but it is tricky - and you need a good understanding of camera exposure to get it right.

My recommendation is to get a camera that can handle it automatically, and it'll probably be on ebay for less than the cost of a Super 8 cart.

Regarding 24fps versus 25fps. Shoot at 24fps, telecine at 25fps - it's what happens to all US films in Europe. The 4% speed-up is too slight for most people to notice.

You may get some flicker in the finished film with artificial lighting/TV screens - so be warned.

Max.


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#4 Max Smith

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 05:43 PM

Okay - but have you lined up somewhere to develop the K40 ? - not that many places still do it.

At least comparing the exposure reading with the K-40 cartridge loaded and the E-64 cartridge loaded should tell you if it's reading it as ISO40T or ISO160T.

Good luck.
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#5 steve dewar

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 05:54 PM

Okay - but have you lined up somewhere to develop the K40 ? - not that many places still do it.

At least comparing the exposure reading with the K-40 cartridge loaded and the E-64 cartridge loaded should tell you if it's reading it as ISO40T or ISO160T.

Good luck.


Cheers. There is a place in London still offering it, although they are really expensive and not too good ior so ve heard from others, but I was thinking of Dwaynes, although I havent made contact with them yet. Im anxious to see if notching the cartridge would work with this camera.
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#6 Pavan Deep

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 01:39 AM

I have used Dwaynes for processing K40 and they're great. As for your camera I have used your model in the past, it's great and works like a charm. I believe the Bauer cameras are very much underratedted, but they offer the filmmaker alot of ease and are truely great with great lenses and a lot of features and often cheap too.

I have used the Vision 2 200T as well as the 64T in my Bauers, the vision film works well with the auto metering, which exposes it as 160, I think. I just pop the cartridge in and use the auto exposure to find the right exposure for the shot and set it manually before I shoot, it works every time. But for the 64T I just stop the exposure down about half and it worked fine.

P
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#7 Colum O Dwyer

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 07:30 AM

Cheers. There is a place in London still offering it, although they are really expensive and not too good ior so ve heard from others, but I was thinking of Dwaynes, although I havent made contact with them yet. Im anxious to see if notching the cartridge would work with this camera.


Would you know where that place in London is maybe? I'd love to shoot off Kodachrome if possible w/out having to ship it to the US.

When I've shot Ektachrome I've used a light meter or my film SLR to give a rough estimate - As my Braun Nizo won't read 64 carts.

If you use an SLR set to ISO 64 [& 1/50sec] and take a reading and then take a reading of the same frame using your cameras light meter, you'll have a good idea whether the cartridge is being read as 40 or 160.
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