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#1 Chase Bowman

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 08:54 PM

Hello,

I'm about to start production on my first feature film on film. We are shooting Super 16, and I have an opportunity to do stock test before I choose my stock.

I was thinking of testing Kodak 250D/500T Vision 3, and 50D/200T Vision 2. The project I'm shooting is a romantic comedy, and is generally high-key with some crucial night exteriors.

I don't want this to be a gritty film (like Half Nelson or Hustle and Flow). Ideally we'd shoot on 35mm with a slower stock, but budget won't allow.

I'm wondering if anybody has any tips for what to do at a stock test in general, and what to do specifically given my desire for low-grain and bright colors on this project.

Thanks so much,

Chase

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www.ChaseBowman.com

Edited by Chase Bowman, 21 October 2009 - 08:56 PM.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 06:22 AM

Light to the ratio youll be shooting. expose normally then go over and under on the scene (normally with a MacBeth chart and someone sitting in approximate clothing they'll be wearing with their same skin tone). I normally go over under by 1/2 stop increments. DO NOT BRING THESE TO "NORMAL" IN TELECINE. this will show you how far over/under you can go on your stock and let you know how it'll look.
Then repeat the same but this time have them correct it all back to normal in the telecine so as to learn how much you can "correct" those less than ideal situations. Also, i recommend doing the same tests for any filtration you might use, try it a bit in mixed lighting etc if you can, but the basic exposure is the main point in testing.
it's also important to use the camera/lenses you'll use for the project as well.
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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 01:05 PM

Testing can reveal a whole bunch of useful stuff, and not just photographic stuff.

Of course you need the specific camera bodies, filters and lenses you'll use for the shoot. Also, get the actual props and wardrobe that will be important in the show. (If production can't come up with these, that tells you a useful thing about how organized they are.) This being a low budget show, invite the actual cast to participate. Invite makeup, hair and wardrobe to come to the test shoot and bring whatever they'd like to test. Use testing to learn about the people you'll be working with, not just the process.

Get as close to actual production conditions as you can. The only thing worse than no testing is half-assed testing that isn't really relevant to anything.





-- J.S.
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