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Mounting small cameras to bicycles


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#1 David Auner aac

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 10:10 AM

Hi folks,

for an upcoming shoot in Feb next years I'm trying to find good ways to mount small cameras, like this one Sony PC8 to bicycles. Most of the shoot will be shot on bikes, so I really need to do it well, safely and as quickly as possible. I want to be able to mount to a lot of places on the bikes, top tube, seat tube, chain stays, head tube, fork...

So far I have thought of super/mafer clamps, mini cardellinis, and various type of grid/pipe clamps. I will wrap the bike frame with a neoprene like material or rubber to protect it from abrasion. And the cameras will be mounted using either little ball heads or Manfrotto camera brackets. Any one got any other good ideas?

Thanks in advance!

Cheers, Dave
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#2 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 11:43 AM

A simple search will tell you that this has been discussed several times before:

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=41060

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=13133

and my post from way back; the shoot turned out really well:
http://www.cinematog...showtopic=31673


Really, each situation is a little different. The general "how do I do this" questions, especially where there is safety involved, are the ones that get people into trouble. Get a good grip. Who knows what they're doing. Who is experienced. Do you have any specific questions? Otherwise, the best general information is pretty much what has already been posted.


-DW
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#3 David Auner aac

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 11:48 AM

A simple search will tell you that this has been discussed several times before:


Duh, dang me! For once I forgot to search boards! Thanks Daniel! I'll be gripping the shoot myself, but there is ample time to prepare and I have quite some experience mounting cameras to trains and cars but never before to bikes.

Cheers, Dave
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#4 David Auner aac

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 11:55 AM

Ok, I checked the threads, but that's not really what I need. First of all, the cameras will be really small, like the one I linked to above. Secondly, these mounts will be in quite obscure places on the bikes, see above as well. So I'm still looking for ideas!

Cheers, Dave
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#5 Daniel Wallens

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 06:39 AM

The size of the camera really doesn’t matter (unless it’s a big camera, then things have to be more secure/stable). But in your case, that’s not the issue.

Like was mentioned in the linked threads, it really comes down to the particular case. How steady you want it, what’s the orientation, etc. Also like what was mentioned in the linked threads, balance is extremely crucial for when operating the bike. And naturally, anything you put on there will affect this.

If your specific question is just naming certain clamps and whether you should use them or not, I’d say: you should not use mafers (they are among the weakest clamps); why would you use a mini cardellini as opposed to a regular cardellini? And most grid clamps have a minimum real solid closure of 1.660 OD (1.25” pipe), and most pipe clamps have a minimum closure of 0.75” or 7/8”. (but I suppose if needed you could put your own bolt in there). Since I have no idea what the size of the pipes are on the bike, I cannot make that decision. There may be some completely other, entirely different way to do it better (just long arms?). Like was mentioned in the linked threads, it really depends on the situation, and it is somewhat irresponsible to say definitively, “this is the way to do it” without having seen the situation, especially when safety is involved. I mean, I could say that, to steady the image, you can double-brace the camera with an additional arm, but you’ve had experience doing this, so I assumed you already knew this. But in terms of a general “how do I do this?” or “what’s the best way to do this?” I’m sorry, but there’s no one single answer.


-DW
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Ritter Battery