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Fujicolor 8521 125t


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#1 Colum O Dwyer

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 01:27 PM

I realize there's a plethora of topics regarding expired film but my main reason for posting is that I have a spool of 8521 I was going to shoot with Monday along with some fresh stock for a 'dream sequence' that us students are so fond of.

Given that I can't establish it's age [only know it's an 80s stock] or whether it was stored properly, I was wondering if anyone could date it for me.

Seems like 2-stops over-exposure would be the minimum.

Thanks,
Colum.

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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 06:07 PM

I realize there's a plethora of topics regarding expired film but my main reason for posting is that I have a spool of 8521 I was going to shoot with Monday along with some fresh stock for a 'dream sequence' that us students are so fond of.

Given that I can't establish it's age [only know it's an 80s stock] or whether it was stored properly, I was wondering if anyone could date it for me.

Seems like 2-stops over-exposure would be the minimum.

Thanks,
Colum.

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I can't answer your question, but for what its worth, I'd just point out the following: this roll if it is 20+ years old won't cut well with the other footage you are going to shoot on Monday. This roll will cost you the same to process and telecine (or perhaps more for telecine as it might well take longer to get a useable image out of it). One more fresh 100' roll of stock will cost you another $40 odd dollars. Ask yourself if the saving of $40 justifies the risk of not getting a result, or getting a poor, bearing in mind your time and the time of everyone else involved.
Just my two cents.
shoot it by all means, but I wouldn't try to mix it in with other footage.
cheers,
richard
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#3 Colum O Dwyer

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 10:09 AM

I can't answer your question, but for what its worth, I'd just point out the following: this roll if it is 20+ years old won't cut well with the other footage you are going to shoot on Monday. This roll will cost you the same to process and telecine (or perhaps more for telecine as it might well take longer to get a useable image out of it). One more fresh 100' roll of stock will cost you another $40 odd dollars. Ask yourself if the saving of $40 justifies the risk of not getting a result, or getting a poor, bearing in mind your time and the time of everyone else involved.
Just my two cents.
shoot it by all means, but I wouldn't try to mix it in with other footage.
cheers,
richard


Your advice is heeded & appreciated sir, but I prefer the production budget to pay for the processing than me. In any case the director was in favour of "going crazy" as he said himself so we'll see how it turns out in a few weeks.

Thanks.

BTW, rated at 32, under daylight w/81ef
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#4 Dominic Case

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 05:06 PM

So, Colum, your ID says you are from Ireland. Out of idle curiosity, where did you take the shot of the film can? I see palm trees in the background. What aren't you telling us? ;)
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#5 Colum O Dwyer

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 06:20 AM

So, Colum, your ID says you are from Ireland. Out of idle curiosity, where did you take the shot of the film can? I see palm trees in the background. What aren't you telling us? ;)


If only we had palm trees and sun! Figured it was a nicer backdrop than a dull sitting room, the wonders of this technological age :P

Edited by Colum O Dwyer, 28 October 2009 - 06:23 AM.

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#6 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 03:29 PM

If only we had palm trees and sun! Figured it was a nicer backdrop than a dull sitting room, the wonders of this technological age :P

I believe that 8521 was introduced in 1995 and withdrawn in 1998.
Brian
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#7 K Borowski

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 04:50 PM

From my experience with old stock, I'd say you want to add a stop every three to four years out of date.

So, if this stock is 125T, from, say, 1997, and you want (somewhat) normal-looking imagery, I'd say you want to rate it in the sub-25 range with tungsten lighting.

Of course, if you are after milky, washed-out foggy imagery, that is something different.
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#8 Colum O Dwyer

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 01:37 PM

I believe that 8521 was introduced in 1995 and withdrawn in 1998.
Brian


Really? Cool. Thanks.

From my experience with old stock, I'd say you want to add a stop every three to four years out of date.

So, if this stock is 125T, from, say, 1997, and you want (somewhat) normal-looking imagery, I'd say you want to rate it in the sub-25 range with tungsten lighting.

Of course, if you are after milky, washed-out foggy imagery, that is something different.


Thanks Karl, I may have under-exposed a tad, but it's all good. Thanks.
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