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An update on my prior "termination" post


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 08:23 PM

Last week I was laid off by my production company. I got a lot of kind words in response, as well as some concerned ones, so I thought I'd give everyone an update.

I'm doing better. I've been keeping busy updating resumes, making business cards. I've been emailing various people I've met on shoots, and contacting more production companies.

There are still those times when I'm a bit down. It's undeniably scary not knowing where the next dollar will come from, and this can get exacerbated with all the new technology out there. I see all those guys with the great new HD stuff and the cool editing systems, and with my XL2, I feel pretty damn behind the curve. But I can hardly afford to upgrade, so I feel stuck.

On the good side, I just learned I've been nominated for the ASC's heritage award! I won't say for which film, in case anyone on this board is judging. I've wanted it for a long time, and it was nice timing to get this good news when I did. Granted, I don't have a prayer going up against the big guys from NYU and the Californias, but at least it's a nice addition to the resume.

So how's everyone else doing?

Brian
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 12:01 AM

I see all those guys with the great new HD stuff and the cool editing systems, and with my XL2, I feel pretty damn behind the curve. But I can hardly afford to upgrade, so I feel stuck.


Yep, I suggest you buy some film gear and learn film. When every one else is going HD, be the guy that offers film. Pick up a K3 off ebay and away you go ;)

With film, you let Kodak and Fuji worry about the "upgrading."

On the good side, I just learned I've been nominated for the ASC's heritage award!


That's pretty damn good! It's not all rain and dark clouds over you then is it? Good for you!

R,
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#3 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 12:10 AM

Hi Brian. That's great about the nomination. Glad to hear you're working on finding a new position. Use your Glidecam and
make that XL2 sing and you'll land someplace where you'll have the cameras you want.
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#4 Brian Rose

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:13 AM

Yep, I suggest you buy some film gear and learn film. When every one else is going HD, be the guy that offers film. Pick up a K3 off ebay and away you go ;)

R,



Actually, I should've mentioned that I do own a fair bit of film equipment: an eclair NPR, two bolexes and a top notch Beaulieu Super 8.

I guess I didn't bring them up because here in KC, I just don't see much going on with film. Oh, I'm sure it's happening, but with the economy and all, it seems like more are going for a digital option (y'know, so they can shoot, and shoot, and shoot!).

That and those 16mms are just regular 16m. Think at this stage a super 16 upgrade for my Eclair would be worth it, or would I be better off socking that money away for something down the line that could get me 1080p, like an HVX, or the Scarlett?

BR
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 08:26 AM

Depends on the demand in your area. I for one have my S16mm cameras as well as my HD, and while the HD sees a lot more work I am very happy to have the option of S16mm. In your situation I'd highly recommend pocketing the cash for the conversion for now and buying something which'll rent a lot (HVX is a bit old and I'm a Sony guy... so look into the EX1R that just came out. Forget Scarlet, at the moment it doesn't exist and you've no way of knowing how "good," it is till it exists). You can always sell your HD cameras as they outdate and move on to greener pastures.
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#6 Gus Sacks

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 09:50 AM

On the good side, I just learned I've been nominated for the ASC's heritage award! I won't say for which film, in case anyone on this board is judging. I've wanted it for a long time, and it was nice timing to get this good news when I did. Granted, I don't have a prayer going up against the big guys from NYU and the Californias, but at least it's a nice addition to the resume.


Well that is certainly awesome. Don't count yourself out, yet. A nomination's a big deal. Best of luck with that and everything.
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#7 Richard Boddington

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 11:30 AM

Oh, I'm sure it's happening, but with the economy and all, it seems like more are going for a digital option (y'know, so they can shoot, and shoot, and shoot!).


In this business one can ever really blame the economy for a lack of work. Even if the economy was booming film and video jobs are tough to come by.

As Ivan Reitman famously said, "the successful people in this industry create their own opportunities." I have found that to be 100% true. All of the biggest names in this business drove their own ideas forward.

R,
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#8 Dominic Case

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:59 PM

There are still those times when I'm a bit down. It's undeniably scary not knowing where the next dollar will come from,

Many years ago I found myself out of work when the company I'd been with for 16 years closed down. The best advice I got from a colleague (a freelance graphic designer) was that freelancing was actually MORE secure than permanent employment. I did it happily for several years before being seduced back into a full-time position.

His argument went like this: if you work full-time for a company, the day they tell you to go away (as yours did) is the day your income goes from 100% to 0% in a heartbeat. It's total dependence. But if you work for a number of customers on a range of projects, then losing any one of them isn't so catastrophic. And if things go quiet, you simply have more time to work the phones, bring up the networks, and try to get busier. Conversely, if the house needs painting, you can stop chasing work so energetically for a while - (and you can be sure that the biggest offer ever will come in just after you've bought the paint!).

Yes, I know that's a fairly rose-tinted view of freelancing - but it's worth taking that view as well as the "undeniably scary" view. It's kept me going for the past few months too!
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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 09:45 PM

His argument went like this: if you work full-time for a company, the day they tell you to go away (as yours did) is the day your income goes from 100% to 0% in a heartbeat. It's total dependence. But if you work for a number of customers on a range of projects, then losing any one of them isn't so catastrophic.


I agree 100% Dominic. Yet, banks only want to lend to people that have full time jobs where some one else writes the pay cheque. If you write your own pay cheque they look at you as one of "those" people. Those "self employed" people.

In Canada the banks policy is that you either produce one pay stub as some one who is employed by some one else, or, three years of tax returns if you are self employed.

I have told bankers here right to their faces, in person, and in the bank....this policy is just plain stupid. And I use the word, "stupid."

R,
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#10 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 09:52 PM

When I first got to LA, one of the very best pieces of advice was to keep lots of irons in the fire. NEVER get too dependent on just one or two clients or people who hire you.

And try to not get in the hole financially to the point where you have to take work that you don't want to. It's never good to give someone else that kind of power over you, whether you're on staff somewhere or out there freelancing.


Oh, and stay in school and don't do drugs. ;)
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#11 Frank Barrera

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 10:03 PM

I agree 100% Dominic. Yet, banks only want to lend to people that have full time jobs where some one else writes the pay cheque. If you write your own pay cheque they look at you as one of "those" people. Those "self employed" people.

In Canada the banks policy is that you either produce one pay stub as some one who is employed by some one else, or, three years of tax returns if you are self employed.

I have told bankers here right to their faces, in person, and in the bank....this policy is just plain stupid. And I use the word, "stupid."

R,


not to get too off topic but this idea of banks being hostel to freelancers is an interesting one. when my wife and i got a loan to buy our little nyc apartment it was basically her full time job that got us the loan. so i just thought that on my own i wouldnt be able to qualify. but over the past few years i've met more and more guys who are freelancing in this business and either are single or their partners are also freelancers and they did get loans. they didnt put large sums down for down payments and they got excellent (better than mine) rates. so i dont know what to think about it anymore. i guess some banks just have a lower thresh hold for qualification than i thought. hmmmm... perhaps this is very much connected to the recent mess in the credit industry.

btw congrats brian on the ASC nod. thats awesome.
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#12 Greg Gross

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:20 AM

Hello Brian,
Sounds like the kid is staying in the picture. You know I have two professions,medicine and photography. I spend about 50%
of my time in each profession. Of course I have to admit that if I do work more in one or the other profession,it usually is pho-
tography where I have the increased work time. In this senario I have my medical profession to rely on if photography sales
start to decline. Usually though(and as a rule) photography has not declined at all for me. Have you ever thought about acting,
writing,directing? Thank you for the update as I was wondering how you were doing. Stay in the picture kid!

Greg Gross
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#13 Richard Boddington

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 01:56 PM

You know I have two professions,medicine and photography.


That's a pretty damn good back-up profession!!

R,
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#14 John Sprung

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 04:09 PM

In this senario I have my medical profession to rely on if photography sales start to decline.


How does the big govenment health care thing look to you? I know some doctors who quit because they didn't want to work all that much, and for part time it wasn't enough money to justify the high cost of insurance.





-- J.S.
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#15 K Borowski

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 06:47 PM

About the only thing I could think of more secure than medicine would be being a mortician.

The spread of pathogens is seasonal and cyclical, but people are *always* dying ;-)
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#16 John Sprung

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 12:55 AM

The reason that medicine is no longer a secure career is government. No telling what they'll do.




-- J.S.
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#17 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:06 AM

John, I really don't want to read anti-government posts here on Cinematography.Com.
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#18 John Sprung

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:35 AM

Um, David, what's anti-government about that? We really don't know what they're going to do.




-- J.S.
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#19 Greg Gross

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 10:24 PM

Gentlemen,
This is a place for art and craft. David Mullen is correct in fact that it is not a place for politics. Lets look to David as a
leader here on our forum and show respect. I am now 62yrs old gentlemen and I am quite comfortable in making this
statement. Thank you David Mullen for your art and craft and for your posts which have taught us all about the craft and
art of cinematography. Anyone who wishes to e-mail me may do so at pd170user@yahoo.com..

Greg Gross
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#20 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 10:46 PM

I've been as guilty as anyone else here at being unable to resist the temptation to defend a political belief, and I've long given up on stopping some posters who constantly express their political bent -- I simply don't read their posts for the most part, or threads that they start.

But John's a colleague of mine who respect a lot and I don't want that respect to slip over politics... so I'm asking that we drop this line of thought, especially since we are not even in the OFF-TOPIC subforum where it might be tolerated.
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Ritter Battery

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Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Tai Audio

CineTape

Opal

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies