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DP wants a complete uncompressed version of the film


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#1 Mark Williams

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:12 AM

Is this standard practice to give the DP a complete uncompressed version of the film for his showreel. If not then what is?

TIA

Mark
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:28 AM

Depends a lot on what you can work out with the producers before hand. Often you'll be lucky to get a DVD copy of the final film.
What could be best is talk with the producers and go through the editor to pull some selects for your reel.
This stuff should, however, be covered well before you roll and even then i'd doubt you'd get uncompressed. Highest quality I've gotten (and try for) is ProResHQ.
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#3 John Brawley

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:43 AM

Is this standard practice to give the DP a complete uncompressed version of the film for his showreel. If not then what is?

TIA

Mark



It's a standard part of my deal memo now that I get an uncompressed HD quicktime or a HDCAM copy of the film / production to use for showreel and award entries etc.

Of course, actually getting a tape or file from producers usually proves a lot more difficult.

I've on many occasions gotten the file or tape by offering to pay for the dub myself, even though the production is meant to supply me with one.

If they've signed a deal memo and can't argue about costs then they usually relent. But it's still a lot of work.

jb
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 05:51 AM

Our SOP is that the DP or any other person who needs material they did for their reel can have access to the masters at the video house that did the show, provided that they sign a form from the legal department. Theoretically, they're supposed to do their reels on their own nickel. In practice, the vendors generally comp the work.




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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 07:45 AM

Our SOP is that the DP or any other person who needs material they did for their reel can have access to the masters at the video house that did the show, provided that they sign a form from the legal department. Theoretically, they're supposed to do their reels on their own nickel. In practice, the vendors generally comp the work.




-- J.S.

That is fair and the way it should be. Too bad it's such a fight to have access to our work sometimes.
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#6 Mark Williams

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 10:41 AM

Our SOP is that the DP or any other person who needs material they did for their reel can have access to the masters at the video house that did the show, provided that they sign a form from the legal department. Theoretically, they're supposed to do their reels on their own nickel. In practice, the vendors generally comp the work.




-- J.S.


John what sort of agreement?

Thanks

Mark
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#7 John Sprung

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 03:44 AM

I haven't seen it. I believe it just has to do with not using the show for any purposes other than a demo reel to get work, and protecting it from piracy.




-- J.S.
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#8 Bob Hayes

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 11:38 AM

Getting footage to show is one of the toughest aspects of being a DP. They scrutinize your reel when they hire you and then refuse to give you footage when you are done. Even if they grant the access the cost is often expensive.

This is what I do.
I put it in my contract. "Access to master footage for personal use, after theatrical release."

With feature films I wait until they have a promo reel cut for sales of the film. The footage is usually very high quality and is distributed to a lot of people so there is little concern of letting the footage go. The length is 2 to 5 minutes with music and decent effects. Because it is short the dubbing cost is reasonable. I pay for the costs myself. The down side is it is often not the footage you are looking for especially that great crane shot you wanted to put on your reel. The upside is it is often some of the best stuff from the film and I can get it before the film is released. Most of my reel is composed of footage from this source. If I am really jonesing for that special shot I approach the producers after the theatrical release and ask for access. Currently I get a DVCAM dub of the whole film. This can be two years after I've shot a project.
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#9 Mark Williams

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 01:13 PM

I haven't seen it. I believe it just has to do with not using the show for any purposes other than a demo reel to get work, and protecting it from piracy.




-- J.S.


Thanks John
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