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What's the origin of the term beaver board?


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#21 JD Hartman

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 07:07 PM

Well said Wick !!

Having dealt with that one , lets move onto 'Bullpricks' and 'Mickey Rooneys' ;)

Sanjay Sami


....and "tampon".
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#22 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 04:20 AM

Apart from agreeing with the working brothers, let me add this link:


http://en.wikipedia....iki/Beaverboard

Beaverboard (also beaver board) is a light wood-like building material, formed of wood fibre compressed into sheets. Originally a trademark[1]. It has occasionally been used as a canvas by artists; most famously, the iconic painting "American Gothic" by Grant Wood is painted on a beaverboard panel.

That's what I always thought it was. What you attach to it or what it reminds you of is your business.


AND let me add this one:

http://www.ew.com/ew...,272440,00.html
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#23 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 04:41 AM

Actually, THIS is even better:

http://www.microfilm...k/gription.html

And if ya need a book:

http://books.google....u...;q=&f=false

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 11 November 2009 - 04:43 AM.

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#24 Aaron Solomon

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 11:16 PM

What is the beaver board used for?

Thanks,
Aaron
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#25 robert duke

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 04:09 PM

What is the beaver board used for?

Thanks,
Aaron


A pancake (1/8 apple box) with a baby plate screwed onto it off set to one side. used to attach lights or flags where even lower to the ground is needed than a premie. sort of a High hat for a light.
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#26 David Rakoczy

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 07:57 PM

I was told on set today that we are not allowed to say beaver board any more because of the negtive origins of the term. The DP wouldn't explain what those origin are and I have to say I have no idea what the origin is ( I do know WHAT I is though). Now I'm really really curious to know.

I'm aware that many terms were once derogatory, like best boy, but that is no longer the case for most, at least in my experienc and that is far from my intention here. I'm just looking to learn and understand what the problem with it is.



Look at one and think about it for a moment... or more if need be...
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#27 Jerry Reedy

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 04:17 AM

In 1903 J. P. Lewis, a paper product maker, glued layers of mat board used for picture framing to make boards for lining his attic.  This took place in Beaver Falls, NY.  In 1906, he formed the Beaver Manufacturing Company.  Later wallboards made of layered wood fibers include Upson Board, Cornell board, Sterling,  and Fibro-Wallboard.

 

 

 

http://www.oldhousew...g/beaver-board/

 

So, just like Buffalo Wings, Beaver Boards were named after a city.  


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#28 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:23 PM

I first heard the term ' 2 T's shot' from the lead actress on a movie I was shooting. She thought it was funny. She also thought 'Mother/Daughter' was hilarious.

 

I agree with others, if you're a sensitive soul with a thin skin, a movie set is no place for you.


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#29 George Ebersole

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 03:42 AM

I was told on set today that we are not allowed to say beaver board any more because of the negtive origins of the term. The DP wouldn't explain what those origin are and I have to say I have no idea what the origin is ( I do know WHAT I is though). Now I'm really really curious to know.

I'm aware that many terms were once derogatory, like best boy, but that is no longer the case for most, at least in my experienc and that is far from my intention here. I'm just looking to learn and understand what the problem with it is.

Best Boy was used up here with a wink and grin kind of connotation when gaffers were talking to one another.  I've never heard the term beaver, but would be of a similar mind as your DP.  I can appreciate blue humor, but there's a time and place for everything, and the work place, even if you're contracting, is not that time nor that place.  Why some people continue to sexualize everything is beyond me.


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#30 JD Hartman

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 04:16 PM

Best Boy was used up here with a wink and grin kind of connotation when gaffers were talking to one another.  I've never heard the term beaver, but would be of a similar mind as your DP.  I can appreciate blue humor, but there's a time and place for everything, and the work place, even if you're contracting, is not that time nor that place.  Why some people continue to sexualize everything is beyond me.

 

 

Best Boy and Gaffer are slang terms from England that were used before the motion picture industry.  "Gaffer" is an expert at everything, usually someone in a manufacturing or engineering firm.  "Best Boy" was his most reliable, creative, ingenious, hard working assistant.  The Gaffer would send out his Best Boy to straighten out a problem when he was too busy to attend to it personally.  Nothing sexual about it.

 

Terms like: tampon, Ubangi, butt plug and bull prick are a diferent story.


Edited by JD Hartman, 19 July 2013 - 04:18 PM.

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#31 John David Miller

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 04:13 PM

I've heard of people being fired for calling large backings of duvetyne "blacks."

Yelling "Lets go, we're hanging some blacks on stage 17." Didn't go over well...

You have to have some prudence set.

You don't hear an AD saying, "we just have a Mother/Daughter then we break for a half," anymore...
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#32 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 05:19 PM

I actually heard myself saying "kill the baby in the fireplace" after a set-up a few years ago.


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#33 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 08:04 AM

I actually heard myself saying "kill the baby in the fireplace" after a set-up a few years ago.

 

Don't do that on a Johnsons commercial !


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