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Which slow film stock to use?


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#1 Raz Birger

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 08:28 PM

Hello.
I am going to shoot a very short clip on 16mm film which will be transferred by a Spirit 2K machine to SD.
For outdoor shooting I plan to use the 7201 Vision2 50D. For indoor I am not sure yet, but I know that I want to stay with slow stocks.
The Indoor scene is in a dark office. I want an old look and I don't mean old by grainy, but by the use of slower film stock and lighting it. I am sure you guys watched Hitchcock's Rear Window - I want the look like when Jeff (James Stewart) watch his neighbors in the dark room trough his binoculars.
I have 4 500W Halogen lamps and my lens is the Meteor 17-69 1.9 (I am shooting with Krasnogorsk-3). Would I be able to shoot with 50D? or should I use some higher speed stock like the 7212 Vision2 100T (which is also tungsten balanced)?

Best Regards,
Raz Birger.
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 09:47 PM

I have 4 500W Halogen lamps and my lens is the Meteor 17-69 1.9 (I am shooting with Krasnogorsk-3). Would I be able to shoot with 50D? or should I use some higher speed stock like the 7212 Vision2 100T (which is also tungsten balanced)?

Shooting on a Tungsten stock lets you get rid of the 85 filter, which will make shooting in a relatively dim space easier.

The faster the film, the more you can spread around your light, unless you want all the shadows to fade out, with the background in shadow.
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#3 Andy Karkut

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Posted 05 November 2009 - 11:24 PM

I had shot on the 7201 and it is such a sharp and *clean* stock, even for S16. I am shooting additional footage to cut with the 7201, and have been advised to use the 7212 because it cuts well with it. I will be shooting on this stock in a couple of days, and will report back on the results right here.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 11:39 AM

Shooting on a Tungsten stock lets you get rid of the 85 filter, which will make shooting in a relatively dim space easier.


You mean the blue 80A filter...

Yes, if you have a tungsten lighting package, then you should look at 100T or 200T stock.
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#5 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 11:02 PM

You mean the blue 80A filter...

Yes I do, The reference to the 85 was a "thinko" :rolleyes: . The situation is backwards to what would need an 85, and I seem to vaguely recall that the 80A has even a worse filter factor than the 85.
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#6 Rob Vogt

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 03:00 PM

Yes I do, The reference to the 85 was a "thinko" :rolleyes: . The situation is backwards to what would need an 85, and I seem to vaguely recall that the 80A has even a worse filter factor than the 85.


Yeah, an 80A is 2 stops, 85 is 2/3 a stop
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 10:52 PM

I think you could do what you want with 7212. It's a very nice looking stock.
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