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Canon Autozoom 518sv and 200T


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#1 Liz Barlow

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 11:16 AM

Hello all,
I am looking for some advice on film stocks and compatibility with my Canon. I have used E64T successfully on many shoots but I have a shoot in November which will be in some low light conditions and I was hoping to use 200T but looking on the Wiki site that isn't listed as read by my camera, the stock recommended is below:

Manual / Auto Exposure (Auto-exposure mechanism reads:25T/16, 40T/25, 64T/40, 100T/64, 160T/100, 250T/160 and 400T/250)

If i use 200T will it over expose? There is no stop adjustment on my camera. To be honest I have got so confused over ASA/ISO/lighting and everything I was hoping some intelligent person could explain it for me, the net seems to be pretty confusing. I am not opposed to buying a new camera which will deal with the film stock but I would need some recommendations on that front too! :rolleyes:

Any help would be really really gratefully received.

LB
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#2 Liz Barlow

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 11:40 AM

I realise I can change the aperture but will that make any difference... if I am being really blonde here I apologise having a very hard day and can't seem to think about all this on top of everything else!
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#3 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 09:23 PM

Hello all,
I am looking for some advice on film stocks and compatibility with my Canon. I have used E64T successfully on many shoots but I have a shoot in November which will be in some low light conditions and I was hoping to use 200T but looking on the Wiki site that isn't listed as read by my camera, the stock recommended is below:

Manual / Auto Exposure (Auto-exposure mechanism reads:25T/16, 40T/25, 64T/40, 100T/64, 160T/100, 250T/160 and 400T/250)

If i use 200T will it over expose? There is no stop adjustment on my camera. To be honest I have got so confused over ASA/ISO/lighting and everything I was hoping some intelligent person could explain it for me, the net seems to be pretty confusing. I am not opposed to buying a new camera which will deal with the film stock but I would need some recommendations on that front too! :rolleyes:

Any help would be really really gratefully received.

LB


From what I know Kodak notches 200 so that it is most likely read as 160 and that slight over-exposure will not be a bad thing. However, I have to not loaded any 200 into that camera so you might want to double check how it will read, which should be easy. Get a cart of 160 film that you know the camera will read properly, like an old 160 Ektachrome or Tri-X and see what reading you get. Now load the 200. It should be the same. If not, you'll know how much you have to correct with manual control. I keep old 160 carts around for that very purpose.

Rick
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 12:53 AM

Your Canon will work just fine with that film-- no need to worry.

Kodak sets up V200T so that it will read at ASA 100 in yours and most other S8 cameras. They speed-notch it at ASA 160, and then supply it in a "notchless" cartridge which is designed to push in the camera's filter pin and kick the ASA setting down another 2/3 stop, which is ASA 100.

What this does is overexpose your film by one full stop, but that's OK, because Kodak recommends this film be overexposed that much. They do this on purpose.

In some cameras, the film will be exposed at ASA 160 and not kicked down, which amounts to a 1/3 stop overexposure. That's OK as well.

By taking out the camera's internal 85 filter, this also means there is no daylight color correction outside, but that's OK too because a transfer can remove this. Indoors you don't need it anyway, and if you really want the correction in-camera then you can always put an external 85 filter over the lens.

So the best thing to do is-- don't do a thing.
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#5 Ethem Pekin

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 04:52 AM

What about 518sv and 500T film?
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#6 Christopher Curry

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 08:56 AM

What about 518sv and 500T film?


I've used my 518sv with V3 500T on auto exposure and the results are great! I used it for a live music video shoot with a tripod sitting next to the drummer. The lighting was changing/flickering (as usual for a music gig) throughout a big chunk of the scene. 500T seems to handle dynamic light/dark changes with ease, but I would make sure first that your scene will be "dark enough" to justify 500T over 200T. As stated before, you don't really need to do a thing to get good exposure.

I haven't finished editing yet but here are some stills:

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

Edited by Christopher Curry, 30 September 2010 - 08:59 AM.

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#7 Ethem Pekin

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 09:07 AM

I've used my 518sv with V3 500T on auto exposure and the results are great! I used it for a live music video shoot with a tripod sitting next to the drummer. The lighting was changing/flickering (as usual for a music gig) throughout a big chunk of the scene. 500T seems to handle dynamic light/dark changes with ease, but I would make sure first that your scene will be "dark enough" to justify 500T over 200T. As stated before, you don't really need to do a thing to get good exposure.

I haven't finished editing yet but here are some stills:

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image


thanks for the reply.
i never experimented negative film.
i have ordered 200t as my plan will involve outdoor shooting as well.
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Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Opal

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport