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hanging leko from angle steel beams


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#1 Iskra Valtcheva

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 06:54 PM

i want to hang a leko from an angle steel support beam: do you think this is a safe rig? (see attached image)
i brainstormed on how to do it here: one simple rig, and another one more elaborate with an extension so that height may be adjustable. while i was doing it, i realized i can substitute the speedrail + pipe clamp with a trombone for less sideways torque. any other/better ideas? everything would be secured with safety chain of course since it's hanging above a performer. the instrument will be a source 4 ellipsoidal with a zoom attachment.

thanks much!
~iskra

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#2 Ross Neugeboren

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 08:38 PM

I'd imagine beams like that (compared to a solid I-Beam) are designed to take force from two directions - top and bottom. You might consider a rig including two theatrical adjustable beam clamps, secured with aircraft cable to a short length of pipe, on which the leko could be hung. This would place the load directly under the beam. Also, a junior nail on plate secured with c-clamps to the bottom of the beam might work, again placing the load under the beam.
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#3 JD Hartman

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 12:00 AM

That should be fine. The C-clamp could even be installed vertically with no problem. The beams you refer to, are actually floor truss and the minor amount of twisting force the fixture will be applying should not be an issue. Don't over engineer your solution. As long as you safety the fixture, as all hanging fixtures should be, it's safe.
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#4 Kevin Fox

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 12:44 PM

As JD notes, just be sure to slip a safety cable through the yoke and around the beam....just in case!

Best
kfox

Edited by Kevin Fox, 12 November 2009 - 12:46 PM.

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#5 Iskra Valtcheva

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 04:37 PM

Thank you all for the helpful suggestions! I'll have an assortment of clamps to play with, and will make sure to safety the lamp, so all should be fine.
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#6 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 11:28 PM

you don't need a junior clamp for that purpose. A regular old C-clamp with a baby pin will do. Hell, even a cardellini would be fine, but I know we are tying to give you the best solution here.

My thoughts when rigging: Least amount of gear and weight. Quick but versatile and strong.
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#7 Iskra Valtcheva

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 07:56 PM

In case anyone's wondering, here's what we ended up doing: junior c-clamp + pipe to suspend it below the fake drop ceiling for a straighter-on angle (we were projecting a gobo on the wall). The weight hanging straight down. Thanks for all the ideas again!

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#8 Hal Smith

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 08:57 AM

It's water over the dam now but a single electrical Unistrut beam clamp clipped on the truss' lower right angle would have worked nicely. They're designed specifically for applications like this. Most have 3/8" threaded holes but some are available drilled for 1/2" thread bolts which would nicely match the hole in the S4's yoke (after taking the theatrical style c-clamp off). And...of course...a safety cable.
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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 03:38 PM

Great "thinking outside the box" idea. Something that is sadly lacking from some film school grads and even those in the biz.
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#10 Hal Smith

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 09:47 PM

Great "thinking outside the box" idea. Something that is sadly lacking from some film school grads and even those in the biz.


Thanks JD, high praise from a working gaffer!
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#11 JD Hartman

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 03:54 PM

Another nice piece of hardware that is a timesaver: http://www.unistrut....p...ikWash&pg=1
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