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#1 Rich Hibner

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 10:52 PM

is there anything that can be used in place of a scrim for low budget film making? just to make sure i'm getting my lingo right. say i had a 650w and wanted to dim it down to 300w, i'd use a scrim right? would using fabric softer sheets dim the light as well as diffuse it? or just diffuse it?
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#2 Gus Sacks

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 06:16 PM

You can use a Double (typically red ringed) scrim to knock a unit down a stop. So a 650w would technically turn into a 325w. A sheet would diffuse, but also would cut down on the transmission of the light. An article in the ASC Mag recently described a production in Egypt using window screens in place of scrims.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 06:50 PM

window screens in place of scrims.


Bingo. You can get bulk screen and the stuff to make frames in any size you want very cheaply. Better yet, replace the screens in your house and use the old ones on set.
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#4 Rich Hibner

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 11:46 PM

nice...that really helps a lot. i'll be going window screen shopping!
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#5 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 04:06 AM

nice...that really helps a lot. i'll be going window screen shopping!


.3 ND will cut your light one stop and the tiny piece you would need for a 650W light is not expensive at all.
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#6 JD Hartman

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:19 PM

It's the mesh, the density of the scrim material that makes the difference. If you compare single and double scrims, in the double you'll see the wire are placed closer together. Window screening might not compare directly to the mesh used in either.
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#7 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 05:48 AM

Plus window screening is often plastic or plastic coated which is likely to melt under the heat of the lamp
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#8 Chris Keth

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 07:48 PM

It's the mesh, the density of the scrim material that makes the difference. If you compare single and double scrims, in the double you'll see the wire are placed closer together. Window screening might not compare directly to the mesh used in either.


Of course it doesn't compare directly, it's the cheapo solution. It is plenty good to put on frames on a budget, though.
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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 03:20 AM

Of course it doesn't compare directly, it's the cheapo solution. It is plenty good to put on frames on a budget, though.


My point is that with slightly more effort than that required by a trip to HomeDee, you can obtain the correct mesh for your wire scrims, cookies, etc. Not an endorsement of this supplier, merely for educational info. http://www.mcmaster....screens/=4ky492 There will be cheaper sources, but when you absolutely have to have some type of mechanical or electrical item, tool or similar, in a hurry, they're hard to beat.

Edited by JD Hartman, 20 November 2009 - 03:22 AM.

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