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Dutch Angle While DOLLYING?


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#1 Jean Paul DiSciscio

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:36 AM

I'm creating a Match Dissolve from two shots. The first shot DOLLIES IN to an ECU on the detailing above an iron gate. As we get closer, the CAMERA begins to move into a DUTCH ANGLE.

The second shot is simply the reverse out from an ECU of a radio, and corrects the DUTCH to a balanced composition while moving back.

Any tips for getting this DUTCH as smooth as possible while DOLLYING?
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#2 Shane Bartlett

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 08:23 AM

Weaver Steadman 3-axis head.


I'm creating a Match Dissolve from two shots. The first shot DOLLIES IN to an ECU on the detailing above an iron gate. As we get closer, the CAMERA begins to move into a DUTCH ANGLE.

The second shot is simply the reverse out from an ECU of a radio, and corrects the DUTCH to a balanced composition while moving back.

Any tips for getting this DUTCH as smooth as possible while DOLLYING?


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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 12:18 PM

The really low-tech approach I used to do in my early days, based on what John Hora did in "Gremlins", was the put the camera on a fluid head crooked, so it wasn't pointed in the same direction as the head was. This way, when you tilted the camera, you were also pitching it to one side. So if you were shooting a low angle and pushing in on the dolly, so naturally had to tilt up as you got closer, the camera naturally dutched to one side at the same time.
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#4 Jean Paul DiSciscio

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 01:07 PM

The really low-tech approach I used to do in my early days, based on what John Hora did in "Gremlins", was the put the camera on a fluid head crooked, so it wasn't pointed in the same direction as the head was. This way, when you tilted the camera, you were also pitching it to one side. So if you were shooting a low angle and pushing in on the dolly, so naturally had to tilt up as you got closer, the camera naturally dutched to one side at the same time.



Thanks, David. I'll try that.
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#5 Manuel Canales

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Posted 17 November 2009 - 08:13 AM

It's amazing, I've done the same movement last weekend, just the way David said and before reading the post. I didn't see the result yet.

If you have a couple of bucks, you could get a Dutch Head, wich is another head crooked over the main one. It was very expensive to me so I did it with just one.

Good luck!
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