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Shooting 7218 with daylight with no 85... ?


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#1 ryan knight

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 08:30 PM

hey there,

i'm gonna be rolling a lot of 7218 in some fairly dark and some very dark interiors (an abandoned warehouse). though i will be lighting with tungsten balanced lamps, the ambient luminance in the facility for several scenes (in the fairly dark ground level sets) will be from spilt daylight light, coming in through windows and doors from other areas of the building.

for these scenes, i can't afford the light loss to put an 85 in front of my 500T to correct to the ambient daylight. i can't test at the location either.

do i a) shoot with no correction and time it out during the supervised transfer? or B) shoot my gray card (for the relevant rolls) with the 85 and then don't shoot any scenes with the 85 to save me the exposure? or c) another option... ?

rk.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 08:50 PM

Use daylight balanced lighting in your scene and time it out supervised. It's very easy to clean up. Also look into an LLB filter, which is like an 85 but less of a filter factor hence less stop compensation (forget maybe 1/3rd of a stop as opposed to 2/3rds).
Shoot your gray card under daylight (lighting conditions you're shooting) if you want them to time out the blue, or under tungsten if you want to keep the blue.
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#3 ryan knight

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 09:13 PM

Use daylight balanced lighting in your scene and time it out supervised. It's very easy to clean up. Also look into an LLB filter, which is like an 85 but less of a filter factor hence less stop compensation (forget maybe 1/3rd of a stop as opposed to 2/3rds).
Shoot your gray card under daylight (lighting conditions you're shooting) if you want them to time out the blue, or under tungsten if you want to keep the blue.


aha, i knew i was brain farting. keep it all consistent to ensure the most effective correcting in the one/best-lights.

i will look into a LLB.

thanks adrian.
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#4 ryan knight

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 09:15 PM

after my tests, it looks as if shooting the 7218 under HMIs with no correction on the lamps looks great. perfect base for my turquoisey "movie darkness" 3 stops under look.

also, the grain and image look the cleanest by over exposing by ONE WHOLE STOP. metering for 250 instead of 500 (or 400 or 320) gave me gorgeously clean results. that's my look, baby. very surprising thought that one whole stop over looked the best (i suppose that 500T is really 400ASA anyway).

best,

rk.
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 10:15 AM

after my tests, it looks as if shooting the 7218 under HMIs with no correction on the lamps looks great. perfect base for my turquoisey "movie darkness" 3 stops under look.

also, the grain and image look the cleanest by over exposing by ONE WHOLE STOP. metering for 250 instead of 500 (or 400 or 320) gave me gorgeously clean results. that's my look, baby. very surprising thought that one whole stop over looked the best (i suppose that 500T is really 400ASA anyway).

best,

rk.


I am not surprised and glad to hear about your results. One stop over for darker S16 scenes is great. Can you post some frame grabs?
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#6 ryan knight

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 03:56 PM

I am not surprised and glad to hear about your results. One stop over for darker S16 scenes is great. Can you post some frame grabs?


not yet. we go to camera this weekend so hopefully early january i can throw some up.

thanks,

rk.
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