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Kodak Tri-X 200D metering question.


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#1 Phil Dexter

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 06:57 AM

Hey guys.
i'm about to shoot some TriX 200D reversal stock, which i've never used before (normally use 500asa negative) with a Canon 1014xls. However, I'm a little concerned about the metering reading I'm getting. I've tried testing it under a single 60w indoor tungsten light in the evening, and even with a 220 degree shutter angle and at 9fps the meter is reading as underexposed, if I point the camera directly at the light bulb it stops down to about f5.6. I've also tested the same film stock in an 814xls and i get the same reading so I guess i just need more light. I'm just quite surprised tha at such a wide shutter angle and shooting 9fps with a 200asa (the camera may read it at 160asa) film I still can't get a light meter reading.

Is this normal for this type of film stock? For a stock that's geared towards film noir and horror films it's a little disappointing if i have to throw allot more light in the scene.

Just wondered if anyone had any experience with this stock.

Thanks
Dexter
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#2 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 01:41 PM

Hey guys.
i'm about to shoot some TriX 200D reversal stock, which i've never used before (normally use 500asa negative) with a Canon 1014xls. However, I'm a little concerned about the metering reading I'm getting. I've tried testing it under a single 60w indoor tungsten light in the evening, and even with a 220 degree shutter angle and at 9fps the meter is reading as underexposed, if I point the camera directly at the light bulb it stops down to about f5.6. I've also tested the same film stock in an 814xls and i get the same reading so I guess i just need more light. I'm just quite surprised tha at such a wide shutter angle and shooting 9fps with a 200asa (the camera may read it at 160asa) film I still can't get a light meter reading.

Is this normal for this type of film stock? For a stock that's geared towards film noir and horror films it's a little disappointing if i have to throw allot more light in the scene.

Just wondered if anyone had any experience with this stock.

Thanks
Dexter



Ive shot with this stock lots
its possible your in camera light meter is broken?
then again shooting under a 60 watt light bulb isnt very strong to begin with
Do you have an incident meter? I find those work best for me
your in camera meter works as a reflective meter,so pointing the meter directly at the bulb which is actually quite bright will tell your camera meter to stop down,making everything else very dark

I guess the solution is just get more light,I think you should be using a lot more than a 60watt bulb
do you have access to any studio lighting?
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#3 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 07:02 AM

If you are zoomed into the light bulb and not just pointing the camera at it, there is a probably a problem with the camera's light meter.
Film noir films often require massive amounts of light. Remember that you need light to make shadows.
I would suggest getting an outboard light meter because I never trust the TTL meters in cameras that are a quarter of a century old.
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#4 Phil Dexter

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 08:40 AM

Thanks for the replies guys.

I really don't think the meter is broken as it's worked fine before with 500asa in low light and I've used 64T stock outside and it's metered fine. Plus i'm getting the same zero reading from my other Canon. I think I was just expecting too much from this stock.

Dan - No, I was not zoomed all the way into the light bulb, just had it in frame from a distance, thats when the meter gave me a reading. You're right, I just need more light or switch back to 500asa negative.

Thanks for your comments though.

Dexter
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#5 Jim Carlile

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 02:21 AM

Remember that those cartridges will be setting the meters at ASA 160, so that gives you about 1/3+ stop difference, in your favor. So you might just be on target, depending upon what the reading is.

Tri-X is ASA 200, but there is no S8 speed indice for that, so the cartridge is notched at ASA 250, and then kicked down to ASA 160 by a notchless cartridge that pushes in the filter pin, thus setting the meter 2/3 stop less than 250. It's the closest they can get to 200.
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