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No Answer to Tying into Breaker


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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 08:46 PM

Hey Josh,

You weren't snubbed on your question. It's a no-no topic here because of the very real danger the topic leads directly to. I got into big trouble when I first started posting here because I tried to answer a similar question and almost got myself kicked off the forums. We just can't address it. Sorry.

A qualified electrician is the best advice anyone can give you, here.
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#2 John Sprung

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 01:54 AM

You could also try some home improvement type sites, and ask about installing a new 50 Amp circuit. Tying in is something I used to do every day for months at a time, but that was 30+ years ago. Times have changed.



-- J.S.
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#3 JD Hartman

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 12:23 PM

You're really asking about adding a "temporary" circuit to the panel for the HMI. Yes that can be done, but if you don't have someone very familiar with electrical work, you would be better off hiring an electrician to install/remove the circuit.
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#4 Bruce Taylor

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 05:38 PM

Yes that can be done, but if you don't have someone very familiar with electrical work, you would be better off hiring an electrician to install/remove the circuit.


Let's think this through a little bit. I think Adrian stated that this is illegal in some areas, and I believe it is where I live in Los Angeles. And it's potentially friggin' dangerous.

So if you don't have a proper electrician doing legal work and something goes wrong... you're the responsible party, legally and otherwise. Just do it the right way, and if you can't afford it, don't do it.

Bruce Taylor
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#5 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 05:40 PM

I think the best answer I've ever seen given to it was "if you have to ask how to do it on an online forum, you shouldn't be doing it"

I forget who it was on here that phrased it lie that, but there you go.
Save yourself the trouble, rent a genny.
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 08:05 PM

Here in Los Angeles, you can legally add a permanent 50 amp circuit and receptacle if there's a double breaker space available in the box. If you have your electrician put the receptacle right under the panel, you can probably get it done for under $300, which means no permit is required. It's clearly more cost effective to just leave that new circuit in place than to have the electrician remove it after the shoot. Compare that with the genny rental, and maybe hit the yellow pages.




-- J.S.
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#7 Bruce Taylor

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 08:44 PM

Here in Los Angeles, you can legally add a permanent 50 amp circuit and receptacle if there's a double breaker space available in the box.


That is a spiffy work around, the permit issue especially. Now the question would be how big a service is hooked up to the house and how much space there is in the box. Standard these days is 100 amps, I think. We lived in a place built in the '40's with a 30 amp fuse box, so obviously that wouldn't work!

Bruce Taylor
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Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Opal

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets