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LIGHTING ISSUES IN HIGH SCHOOL HIGHWAYS!


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#1 Stu Segal

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 06:00 PM

Hello to all Cinema Experts and Lovers

I am a first year film student shooting on a Bolex 16mm cam
My film takes place during the day in a poorly lit tungsten based fluorescent
lighted high school. In different parts of the high school, the hallway ends off
with different ends. One of them has huge windows with plenty of daylight to come in. Similarly,
within the classroom, there is a wall of natural lit daylight that flows in that interacts with the tungsten lights. I did a test shoot on FUJI REALA 500D and some of the shots came out a bit green.
I didn't think to test with any of my actors because I didnt have any on hand. So I am worried about the colour balance when I go from hall to hall and from hall to classroom mixing a lot of daylight with tungston. I have access to a three point lighting kit and a low budget. That's about it.
If anyone has any ideas what I could do to balance the lights without too much trouble while keeping the realism aspect and allowing the people in the film to look decent, I'd love some help!
I've heard a few ideas of using a grey card somewhere to correct the hallways, but that it might throw off the classroom with the daylight. Also using a half blue filter with distortion behind the camera on the dolly to light the subject in frame. Also using a FL-D I believe (1/4 or 1/8 magenta) gel in front of the camera.

THANK YOU.

Edited by Stu Segal, 03 December 2009 - 06:03 PM.

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#2 Tom Jensen

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 06:07 PM

Change out the bulbs to either tungsten balanced or daylight balanced and then gel the windows and your units accordingly. If your bulbs and film stock are tungsten you can gel the window with CTO and you don't have to gel your lights. If your bulbs are daylight and you use daylight balanced, you don't have to gel your window but you will have to gel your lamps (if stock is daylight). Did I get that right?

Edited by Tom Jensen, 03 December 2009 - 06:08 PM.

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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 10:44 PM

Change out the bulbs to either tungsten balanced or daylight balanced and then gel the windows and your units accordingly.


Daylight bulbs (preferably the "HCR" or "Kitchen bathroom Daylight" type, might work you set up your camera to use daylight.

If you can get enough light on your actors from some portable lights the Florescents will not have too much effect. If you can't change the bulbs or overwhelm them with portable lights, perhaps you could Gel the Florescent Lights with a magenta or FL-D coloured gel. No solution meets a student budget.

The pros would probaly gel the windows to tungsten and bring in a truck load of lights to overwhelm the FL lights.
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