Jump to content


Photo

Kodak RAR 2496 and 2498 film, which ISO should I aim?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Richardson Leao

Richardson Leao
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 363 posts
  • Other
  • Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 13 December 2009 - 06:45 AM

Hi,

I have some rolls of Kodak RAR film 2496 and 2498 16mm that i'd like to try, so I was wondering which ISO should it be exposed at? Also, are they both orthochromatic? Thanks heaps for the help!

richardson
  • 0

#2 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 20 December 2009 - 04:37 AM

Hi,

I have some rolls of Kodak RAR film 2496 and 2498 16mm that i'd like to try, so I was wondering which ISO should it be exposed at? Also, are they both orthochromatic? Thanks heaps for the help!

richardson


Hello Richardson

Sorry to take so lomg with the information - I had to dig the datasheets out from my loft.

2498 has a rating of 250 Daylight and 200 Tungsten When processed for 2 1/4 mins in D96 (Normal Motion Picture Developer) and 200 Daylight 160 Tungsten when processed as reversal.

2496 has a rating of 125 in tungsten developed for 1 minute at 95 deg F or 160 when reversal processed. You can also develop for 6 mins in D76 to give a gamma of 1.0.

I have copies of the datasheets which I can scan if anyone wants them.
Brian
  • 0

#3 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 20 December 2009 - 04:40 AM

Hello Richardson

Sorry to take so lomg with the information - I had to dig the datasheets out from my loft.

2498 has a rating of 250 Daylight and 200 Tungsten When processed for 2 1/4 mins in D96 (Normal Motion Picture Developer) and 200 Daylight 160 Tungsten when processed as reversal.

2496 has a rating of 125 in tungsten developed for 1 minute at 95 deg F or 160 when reversal processed. You can also develop for 6 mins in D76 to give a gamma of 1.0.

I have copies of the datasheets which I can scan if anyone wants them.
Brian

Whoops - too much of a hurry. The time for 2496 is in D19 and for 2498 the temperature for D76 is 68 deg F (20C).
Brian
  • 0

#4 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 20 December 2009 - 04:54 AM

Whoops - too much of a hurry. The time for 2496 is in D19 and for 2498 the temperature for D76 is 68 deg F (20C).
Brian


  • 0

#5 ulrik

ulrik

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other
  • Copenhagen

Posted 21 December 2009 - 07:04 PM

Brian,

Sorry if this is slightly off topic, but is it possible to simulate the D96 process with a D76?
I read that they are essentially the same developers; D96 for transport/D76 for tank.

Is it then 6 min. at 20C in stock dilution?

I'm very interested, as I am trying to get an old film recorder calibrated. It's pretty far off in alignment and calibrations, so it would be great if I could get it within reasonable tolerance before sending test rolls off to the lab.

Thanks, Ulrik
  • 0

#6 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 22 December 2009 - 04:33 AM

Brian,

Sorry if this is slightly off topic, but is it possible to simulate the D96 process with a D76?
I read that they are essentially the same developers; D96 for transport/D76 for tank.

Is it then 6 min. at 20C in stock dilution?

I'm very interested, as I am trying to get an old film recorder calibrated. It's pretty far off in alignment and calibrations, so it would be great if I could get it within reasonable tolerance before sending test rolls off to the lab.

Thanks, Ulrik

The datasheet does not specify the dilution of D76, I would suggest it is not diluted but used as a stock solution.

These are the formulas for D76 and D96.
D76 D96
Water 750 mL 750 mL
Metol 2 gms 1.5 gms
Sodium Sulphite 100 gms 75 gms
Hydroquinone 5 gms 1.5 gms
Potassium Bromide 0.4 gms
Borax 2 gms 4.5 gms

Water to 1 litre

As you can see the formulations are similar; they have the same constituents but different quantities. As you mention D96 is for continuous processing machines with high levels of agitation and with continuous replenishment; D76 is for tank use and essentially is used as a one-shot developer, for this reason it has a higher level of preservative (Sodium Sulphite). The Borax is an accelerator and works in combination with the metol/hydroquione developing agents. Because of the higher agitation the D96 has less developing agents and more borax. The potassium bromide is a fog reducer and is only added when the bath is first made up, during use bromide comes out of the films so it is not necessary to add any during replenishment.

I am sure that you could substitute D76 for D96 but you would have to ensure that you had plenty of agitation and you would have to increase the developing time. As always a test would be wise.

Right that's it I am off to sit in a darkened room. Seasons Greetings
Brian
  • 0

#7 ulrik

ulrik

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other
  • Copenhagen

Posted 22 December 2009 - 06:21 PM

Thank you.

I'm from the still photography world, getting in to cinematography and trying to find the similarities/differences of the more or less same products.

I've been using tri-x and plus-x in still. The ISO ratings are different in cine/still. I this because they are developed to a different gamma or are they just totally different films? Plus-x is ISO 80 on the negative cine film and 125 on the still.

BTW: Your website is very informative. Very cool.

Ulrik
  • 0

#8 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 23 December 2009 - 06:57 AM

Thank you.

I'm from the still photography world, getting in to cinematography and trying to find the similarities/differences of the more or less same products.

I've been using tri-x and plus-x in still. The ISO ratings are different in cine/still. I this because they are developed to a different gamma or are they just totally different films? Plus-x is ISO 80 on the negative cine film and 125 on the still.

BTW: Your website is very informative. Very cool.

Ulrik

I believe that the still and cine versions of Plus-x have a similar emulsion, however the cine version has addition layers such as a supercoat to reduce the possibility of emulsion scratches because the film is moving through the camera. The cine version is also perforated with BH .1866 neg perforations whilst the still version is KS .1870 pos perforations. I think the main difference between the speeds is that the still speed is calculated on the minimum exposure whilst the cine one has additional exposure to ensure that the shadows are not crushed and in addition the motion picture printing chain is nominally fixed as far as duplicating gammas are concerned. You don't have the option of using different grades of printing paper as you do with stills. Obviously if you get into the digital domain you have much more ways to manipulate your image.

Perhaps if anyone from Kodak is watching they can verify my thoughts or tell me I am
talking rubbish!

I use Plus-X Motion Picture negative for my stills, only because I can scrounge short ends. I expose it at 80 ASA and develop as for the stills film.
Thanks for the kind remark about my website.
Brian
  • 0

#9 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 26 December 2009 - 07:23 PM

Hello all,
I am wondering what purpose the RAR stocks were designed for? Are they infrared?
cheers,
richard
  • 0

#10 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 28 December 2009 - 05:57 AM

Hello all,
I am wondering what purpose the RAR stocks were designed for? Are they infrared?
cheers,
richard

RAR stands for Rapid-access Recording. There were (are) a wide range of films for high speed photography, oscillograph recording etc.

The description of 2496 is: Kodak 2496 RAR film (estar-AH base) is a member of the Kodak family of RAR films designed especially for rapid-access recording and high temperature (up to 130 deg F) processing.

USES: Photorecording with artificial light (all sources) and daylight
Bubble chamber recording
Cloud-chamber recording
Modulated glow-tube (all types) recording
CRT photography (all phosphors)

2498 had the following uses:
Photorecording with artificial light (all sources) and daylight
High speed photography
CRT photography (all phosphors)
Spark chamber photography

I have datsheets for a number of other RAR films including some infra-red, if I remember correctly.

Brian
  • 0

#11 Brian Pritchard

Brian Pritchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 328 posts
  • Other
  • Stoke-on-Trent, UK

Posted 28 December 2009 - 06:21 AM

I have extracted the following info for those who care - apologies to those who don't!

Type Sensitivity Photo Rec Speed Processing Base Backing ASA

2479 Extended Red Pan 500 Negative 4 mil Estar-AH Fast Drying (PX) 320 in D76
2490 Blue 64 Negative 4 mil Estar Dyed Gel
2492 Ortho 160 Negative 4 mil Estar Clear Gel
2494 Extended Blue 50 Negative 4 mil Estar-AH Fast Drying (PX)
2495 Ortho 320 Negative 4 mil Estar-AH Fast Drying (PX)
2496 Extended Red Pan 125 Negative 4 mil Eastar-AH Fast Drying(PX) 80 in D76
2497 Extended Blue 50 Negative 4 mil Estar Dyed Gel
2498 Panchromatic 320 Reversal 4 mil Estar-AH Fast Drying (PX) -
2 50 Negative 250 in D19
3493 Extended Blue 50 Negative 2.5mil Estar Clear
5498 Panchromatic 250 Negative 5.25 Mil Triacetate Static Resistant 250 in D19
250 Reversal

This information comes from datasheets dated 1980 and 1976.

Brian
  • 0

#12 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 28 December 2009 - 05:46 PM

Thanks for the info brian. much appreciated.
richard
  • 0

#13 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 04 January 2010 - 03:48 AM

g'day richardson,
did you have a go with the RAR film stock? Can you let me know if you did? Perhaps send me an email
richard@nanolab.com.au
cheers,
richard
  • 0

#14 William Nair

William Nair

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Other
  • Orange County, Ca.

Posted 06 March 2016 - 03:35 PM

Is this 2498 a reversal or negative film ?

 

dead dog


  • 0


Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Opal

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Technodolly

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Metropolis Post