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Calibrating Monitor Canon 5D MKII


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#1 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 05:50 PM

Hi guys, i have a doubt, how can i calibrate a marshall monitor with the canon 5D MKII, i mean this camera don't give color bars, so how can i calibrate it?.

Thanks.
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#2 Ryan Thomas

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 08:16 PM

My first thought would be is there anyway you can generate color bars in final cut pro then put it on your CF card to later play it back? Not sure if this is still accurate, but it's a step closer!

Edited by Ryan Thomas, 17 December 2009 - 08:17 PM.

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#3 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 02:41 PM

My first thought would be is there anyway you can generate color bars in final cut pro then put it on your CF card to later play it back? Not sure if this is still accurate, but it's a step closer!


I tried that, but it doesn-t work, the camera does not read the file.
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#4 Ram Shani

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 05:12 PM

did you tried to put it in jpeg?
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#5 Daniel Miranda

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 02:29 PM

did you tried to put it in jpeg?


yes i tried it, i made the file in jpeg but it doesn't work.
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#6 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 27 December 2009 - 04:08 AM

Here ya go, 2nd post from the bottom: http://www.cinema5d....4ac99582297d547.

Just drop it onto your card from your computer and it should play back in your camera. Works in my 7D.
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#7 JD Hartman

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 01:58 PM

Sorry, I'm neither an DP or an AC. Why couldn't you shoot a color chip chart, as you would with a film camera? Compare the actual chart to the image on the monitor and adjust (by eye) the monitor accordingly?
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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 01:58 AM

Sorry, I'm neither an DP or an AC. Why couldn't you shoot a color chip chart, as you would with a film camera? Compare the actual chart to the image on the monitor and adjust (by eye) the monitor accordingly?

I guess you could in a pinch, but people generally like to calibrate monitors to SMPTE bars because it's a simple, repeatable process that doesn't rely on the color rendering characteristics of the lens or the sensor. Doing it with a chip chart would be hit or miss - for example, if your particular camera's sensor doesn't see certain colors accurately, or has a different color reponse under tungsten versus daylight lighting, then that would skew your calibration.
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#9 JD Hartman

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 11:49 AM

I see. So for "accurate" on-set color monitoring (which would only be an approximate), wouldn't it be better to have the unit "calibrated" and locked before it went into the field? Why would further adjustment be needed?
Conversely, if the image of the chip chart displayed on an accurately calibrated monitor, wasn't 100% dead on. You'd know that there was an issue with your camera (as you stated) and could prepare the post-production people accordingly. Or given that same information, you could reject the un-reliable "new" technology and go back to shooting film.

Edited by JD Hartman, 13 January 2010 - 11:53 AM.

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#10 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 03:35 AM

I see. So for "accurate" on-set color monitoring (which would only be an approximate), wouldn't it be better to have the unit "calibrated" and locked before it went into the field? Why would further adjustment be needed?

Well, part of calibration is tied to the viewing environment, so if you calibrated your monitor in a dark room and then went outside with it to shoot a day exterior, then the calibration would be off. The colors would probably be good, but the contrast and brightness would be too dark, causing you to overexpose. But having exposure tools like a waveform, histogram, or light meter would help negate that.

Conversely, if the image of the chip chart displayed on an accurately calibrated monitor, wasn't 100% dead on. You'd know that there was an issue with your camera (as you stated) and could prepare the post-production people accordingly.

You're right, the chip chart would be more for testing the camera/sensor/lens to see what it can and can't do and to adjust the photography and art accordingly. So it's more of a prep thing and not an on-set calibration thing.

Or given that same information, you could reject the un-reliable "new" technology and go back to shooting film.

Hey I'm with you there, brother! Which petition do I sign?
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#11 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 11:41 PM

Go by eye. I used a marshall monitor recently and liked it very much. Sometimes you can't even judge the exposure off the back LCD in certain viewing environments...

BTW, the new "unreliable" technology is fantastic, and looks great. On a recent shoot I used (2) 7D's and (1) 5D (music video). We were able to get the camera in rigs, and spaces that would have not been possible with most other cameras. After bring the footage into a professional Telecine Facility and seeing what it's capable of, I wouldn't hesitate to use it again.

Bars and Tone...yes, they should fix that. Bear in mind though, this camera was made for people who shoot documentary photographs, buy also want the option to shoot video. No need for Bars in that situation.

jamie
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#12 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 01:45 PM

Jaime, did you notice the color bars jpeg I put on my CF cards? Were they helpful at all? Wish I could make them permanent instead of replacing them every time I format the cards.

*I've personally found the bars help even when you've only got the camera's LCD to go off of, because a lot of times the LCD is too bright and makes you think your exposure is more to the right than it really is. By checking the bars you can dial down the LCD brightness to a normal level.

Edited by Satsuki Murashige, 15 January 2010 - 01:49 PM.

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#13 ryan knight

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 08:25 PM

does anyone have insight as to whether the LCDs on the 5DMKII and the & 7D can be trusted (to what extent), when viewing/judging exposure and contrast and color?
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#14 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 04:12 AM

does anyone have insight as to whether the LCDs on the 5DMKII and the & 7D can be trusted (to what extent), when viewing/judging exposure and contrast and color?

Put the smpte bars jpeg on your cf card, and you will have a pretty good idea of when you can trust your LCD and when you need to adjust it's brightness.
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