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5D with lightmetter. ISO problem?


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#1 Tadeusz Kieniewicz

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 06:30 AM

Hi there! I just bought a new 5D mkII. Few minutes ago I was trying to shoot a scene measuring light with Sekonic first. I set ISO 400 in camera and in Lightmetter also 400.
I measured 18%grey and it shows 1/125 and F/2.0 i set these in camera and it were to to much light about 1.5 stop. is it possible that Iso in camera is not seted precasily? I mean if I want to cooperate with light metter i shoul set 200 in camera and 400 in lightmetter? Or what?


Thnks for time, and sory for my language:)
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#2 Ivan Lebedev

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 10:49 PM

Yea, it may be a difference between spotmeter and a camera... like when shooting on film... It's not so frequent when your film speed matches accuratly
with your meter...so you usually have to do the test in this case to find out the difference... So do the same with a photo camera...

Edited by Ivan Lebedev, 21 January 2010 - 10:50 PM.

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#3 JD Hartman

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 01:55 PM

Yea, it may be a difference between spotmeter and a camera... like when shooting on film... It's not so frequent when your film speed matches accuratly
with your meter...so you usually have to do the test in this case to find out the difference... So do the same with a photo camera...


Could it be that your lightmeter is out of calibration? Comparing light readings with the camera and another meter, unless recently calibrated, would only introduce more unknowns.
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#4 Tom Jensen

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 03:40 PM

Could it be that your lightmeter is out of calibration? Comparing light readings with the camera and another meter, unless recently calibrated, would only introduce more unknowns.


Not necessarily. It isn't uncommon for a gaffer's light meter to be different from a DP's meter. If that's the case, you just compensate the ISO on your meter to match the Dp's. He can do the same with his meter and the camera. You just need to figure out what the actual difference is.
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#5 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 08:22 PM

Shane Hurlbut, ASC wrote a most informative article on the Jan 2010 ASC magazine edition (if memory does not fail me) about his extensive experience using the 5D mkII on many projects, form a feature-length documentary to commercials. He wrote that, in his experience, the 5D mkII camera is best not used in conjunction with a light meter. I don't have the article in front of me, so I can't be of much help beyond that, but reading the the article may be helpful.

Edited by Saul Rodgar, 28 January 2010 - 08:24 PM.

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#6 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 02:13 AM

Hurlbut in his article says, "I've been in situations where my meter read T0.7 and we were exposing at T4, and the subject looked like he was keyed."

I have to agree with this - use the in camera histogram (off a still) or use the waveform off a good on board monitor for exposure. Do your own tests if you want to use a meter but use it only as a guide.
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#7 Tom Jensen

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 10:16 AM

Hurlbut in his article says, "I've been in situations where my meter read T0.7 and we were exposing at T4, and the subject looked like he was keyed."

I have to agree with this - use the in camera histogram (off a still) or use the waveform off a good on board monitor for exposure. Do your own tests if you want to use a meter but use it only as a guide.


When you come down to it, you don't really need a meter. You can light by eye with a camera and amonitor.
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#8 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 29 January 2010 - 03:09 PM

Hurlbut in his article says, "I've been in situations where my meter read T0.7 and we were exposing at T4, and the subject looked like he was keyed."

I have to agree with this - use the in camera histogram (off a still) or use the waveform off a good on board monitor for exposure. Do your own tests if you want to use a meter but use it only as a guide.


Thanks for clarifying that. Dunno where my copy of the ASC magazine is.
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