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#1 Alberto Larios-Saavedra

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 10:19 PM

When you throw an ND filter on the camera, are you supposed to compensate for it?
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#2 Tom Jensen

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 10:32 PM

When you throw an ND filter on the camera, are you supposed to compensate for it?


You figure it in to your meter but you don't open the lens back up. You would just be back to square one.
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#3 Chris Millar

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 11:40 PM

You figure it in to your meter but you don't open the lens back up. You would just be back to square one.


With less DOF - which is why you might want an ND. :huh:

So, first things first - to the original poster: why are you using an ND ?
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#4 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:02 AM

With less DOF - which is why you might want an ND. :huh:

So, first things first - to the original poster: why are you using an ND ?


Brain fart. You nd it so you can open it up. Thank you. Someone has to keep me straight. :blink:
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#5 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 12:17 AM

THis thing wouldn't let me edit. Ok, let's say you are outside and you take a light reading and it is an f:22. You will have to close the lens all the way down. That's not very attractive photography. Everything will be in focus. If you put and ND3 on it, you will lose a stop and you will be shooting at f:16. If you put an ND6 on it, you will now be shooting at f:11. If you put an ND9 on it you will be shooting at an f:8 which is much more attractive than shooting at an f:22. So yes, you do compensate for using an ND to decrease depth of field or even to get the image on the film if you are overexposed beyond the range of the lens.
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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 01:48 AM

You might want to compensate for long exposures - time lapse kinda carry on.

They are basically a get out of jail free card when you are stuck technically or aesthetically with certain stops, shutter angles, stock and/or lighting.

You can trick meters with them to make math easier and make auto exposure cameras (super8 city) do odd things - fun fun

There are grad ND's too, centre ND's - polas work as ND - so yeh, tell us more about why you think you need one...
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#7 Alberto Larios-Saavedra

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 05:18 PM

You might want to compensate for long exposures - time lapse kinda carry on.

They are basically a get out of jail free card when you are stuck technically or aesthetically with certain stops, shutter angles, stock and/or lighting.

You can trick meters with them to make math easier and make auto exposure cameras (super8 city) do odd things - fun fun

There are grad ND's too, centre ND's - polas work as ND - so yeh, tell us more about why you think you need one...


I needed one because there was just too much sunlight for an outside scene, and in this case, so much light that the light meter showed and overexposure reading. So in other words, it was just trying to get a properly exposed image on tape (it wasn't for depth of field, which to be honest, I hadn't even thought of).
Thanks for the help.
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#8 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:22 PM

I needed one because there was just too much sunlight for an outside scene, and in this case, so much light that the light meter showed and overexposure reading. So in other words, it was just trying to get a properly exposed image on tape (it wasn't for depth of field, which to be honest, I hadn't even thought of).
Thanks for the help.


It is a very important factor. Some DP's prefer to shoot at a certain stop and will light to that stop. As you well know, when you stop down the depth of field increases and the look of the shot changes. Many DP's will shoot at 2 stops closed down from wide op because this is what many consider to be the optimum shooting stop. You don't want a lot of depth in most cases because you can isolate the action with focus. Your eye is drawn naturally to the areas of the film that are in focus.
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#9 Chris Millar

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 07:31 PM

I needed one because there was just too much sunlight for an outside scene, and in this case, so much light that the light meter showed and overexposure reading. So in other words, it was just trying to get a properly exposed image on tape (it wasn't for depth of field, which to be honest, I hadn't even thought of).
Thanks for the help.


Your meter showed an overexposed reading ??

You mention tape so I dont think you're doing long exposures - something isn't right here :huh:
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#10 boy yniguez

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 08:14 AM

I needed one because there was just too much sunlight for an outside scene, and in this case, so much light that the light meter showed and overexposure reading. So in other words, it was just trying to get a properly exposed image on tape (it wasn't for depth of field, which to be honest, I hadn't even thought of).
Thanks for the help.


most video cams have built-in neutral density filters to compensate for bright sunlight.
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