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First super8 short on a 814 camera: suggestions?


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#1 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 03:32 PM

Next Wednesday, I will be shooting my first super 8 short.
The project will be a combination of
VHS
HDV
and super 8 footage.
The short will be noir like and I have a 4 light tungsten kit to create this effect.

I know very little about film. I'm shooting on a vintage Canon 814 camera (auto zoom or something) and the stocks i'm using are the Kodak Vision 3 and vision 2.

Does anyone have any suggestions or special tips to make sure my first attempt at "filming" is not in vain.

If the footage does not come out correctly, it would not ruin the project, however I would like to include the super 8 footage.

Thanks a bunch

Wayne

PS. The footage will be transferred in hd. Does anyone recommend a good reasonably priced Telicine services.
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#2 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 07:41 PM

the stocks i'm using are the Kodak Vision 3 and vision 2.


If you are going for a noir-like look I am not sure colour neg is the film to shoot. You don't need the extra speed with your light kit, so why not shoot B&W reversal? Might be closer to the look you are after - a little grainier, more contrasty and "naturally noir".
Rick
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#3 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:27 PM

If you are going for a noir-like look I am not sure colour neg is the film to shoot. You don't need the extra speed with your light kit, so why not shoot B&W reversal? Might be closer to the look you are after - a little grainier, more contrasty and "naturally noir".
Rick


True..

Mainly I just wanted the option. I might revert to black and white in post. Again I'm new to film and don't know all this much.
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#4 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:53 PM

Also do you recommend setting the camera to automatic or regular?
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#5 Sean Ryan Finnegan

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:21 AM

Also do you recommend setting the camera to automatic or regular?


Automatic...what?
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#6 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:48 AM

Automatic...what?


Sorry Auto Vs. Manual..

However with this camera the, the manual features are very limited!
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#7 Rick Palidwor

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 02:19 PM

Sorry Auto Vs. Manual..

However with this camera the, the manual features are very limited!


If you understand how to use manual exposure that is best. Look in the viewfinder as you turn that manual dial and you'll how to set the F-stop. If you do not understand this then shoot in auto, just avoid extremes (e.g. dark subject, bright background).
Rick
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#8 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:48 PM

If you understand how to use manual exposure that is best. Look in the viewfinder as you turn that manual dial and you'll how to set the F-stop. If you do not understand this then shoot in auto, just avoid extremes (e.g. dark subject, bright background).
Rick


Alright that makes since, thanks!

When the aperture is totally closed, will the footage be totally black to the point that no light coming in?

and the opposite if it was all the way open?
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#9 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 02:25 PM

When the aperture is totally closed, will the footage be totally black to the point that no light coming in?

and the opposite if it was all the way open?


What do you mean by "totally closed" and "all the way opened"?

I suggest to read the owners manual, downloadable via Internet. It's useful not only for domestic users but also for some Directors of Photography ;)
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#10 Wayne Smith III

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 12:18 AM

What do you mean by "totally closed" and "all the way opened"?

I suggest to read the owners manual, downloadable via Internet. It's useful not only for domestic users but also for some Directors of Photography ;)


I'm getting this info from the manual.

I'm just wondering, if the aperture is fully opened to it's maximum capacity, will the image be totally white. Or will some detail still remain.

The book does not specify.

thanks

(Actually the camera came with the manual... totally mint condition! :P)
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#11 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 06:22 AM

I'm getting this info from the manual.

I'm just wondering, if the aperture is fully opened to it's maximum capacity, will the image be totally white. Or will some detail still remain.

The book does not specify.

thanks

(Actually the camera came with the manual... totally mint condition! :P)


Ehm of course the manual doesn't specify, because that's Photography's basics... the aperture closes or opens to expose correctly the image... sometimes perfect exposed image will be obtained with the aperture at it's most opened position, sometimes at the closest.

The aperture is not for fading to black nor white, it's for selecting the correct exposure for each image.

Sorry for the question, but are you really a Director of Photography or am I misunderstanding anything in this question? :huh:
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#12 Wooda McNiven

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 03:00 PM

Wayne,

It's too bad you do not have time to shoot some tests. This is really an essential part of using film. Because you can't see immediately what you have shot, you need to know beforehand what to expect. Tests allow you to familiarize yourself with the film stock, among other important considerations.

That being said... learn how to manually set the exposure on your camera.

Just before you roll film, zoom into that part of the frame that you want to expose correctly (e.g. an actor's face). See what exposure the camera is telling you to use then lock on this exposure value using the manual controls. You can then zoom back to the framing you want and start to roll film.

The above recommendation is very simplistic as there are often multiple other factors to consider, but for a beginner it should produce more than acceptable results.

Good luck.
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