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Avoiding Shadows on the off side


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#1 Malik Sajid

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 11:36 AM

Well, being a student with very limited lights in the bag, i just want to ask this.
In our lighting class exercise we are given 3, 1000k tungsten lights. I always came across this situation? How can i avoid those ugly nose shadow that is created by placing the key light, say, 40 degree angle.
Should the light be on very side? or higher?

How can i get this image?

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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 12:41 PM

Take the lamp more 'side-y'... use some diffusion to soften the shadow. There are two sources lighting that shot. One is the fill which looks pretty much straight on then a brighter Key from the camera left side. Notice it does not reach her left eye?

One note... shadows are part of life. Use them.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 01:59 PM

Please replace this photo with a smaller file, I'm getting a SLOW SCRIPT warning every time I try to open this page.

I don't find nose shadows objectionable so I have a hard time commenting on the question. Noses stick out and thus create shadows except in flat lighting, or when the lighting is so sidey that the tip of the nose shadow wraps into the cheek shadow. Of course, softer keys create softer shadows if the hard nose shadow is bothering you.
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#4 Tanveer mir

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 10:05 AM

your source has to be always justified,so it is always situation based,shadows are as important as your light is.though in the pic. you could reduce the intensity of the key to get a soft wrap.to make it pleasing you can hold a poly on the fill side and accentuate the light coming from the same key or with a different source to get a glint in the eye and a softer shadow.
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 10:12 AM

your source has to be always justified.



...not always.
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 11:07 AM

...not always.


I always remember a post on CML where the Director asked the DP where a light was supposed to be comming from, "The same place as the music" was the reply.
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#7 Michael Nash

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 06:20 PM

How can i get this image?


If you notice there is no "nose shadow" in the pic because the entire side of the face is one big shadow. Take your key light more to the side so that none of its light falls on the opposite cheek.

That said, everyone here is correct: There are shadows in life, so they don't always have to be ugly; if you find a shadow distracting you can make it a little less objectionable by making the light softer; and a lower contrast ratio tends to make shadows less visibly prominent than a higher contrast ratio.

Learning where to place the light for the desired modeling and shadow is the art of cinematography. Practice, practice, practice!
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#8 David Rakoczy

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 07:15 PM

..and read this.
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 03:09 AM

your source has to be always justified


Certainly not. The only limit is that our sources be believable. It's a HUGE difference. You've seen it a hundred times in a movie but have you ever asked yourself what was the motivation for the fill?
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#10 Malik Sajid

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Posted 03 January 2010 - 10:08 AM

Please replace this photo with a smaller file, I'm getting a SLOW SCRIPT warning every time I try to open this page.

I don't find nose shadows objectionable so I have a hard time commenting on the question. Noses stick out and thus create shadows except in flat lighting, or when the lighting is so sidey that the tip of the nose shadow wraps into the cheek shadow. Of course, softer keys create softer shadows if the hard nose shadow is bothering you.



That is very informational. Thanks a lot

But i am sorry, i am not been able to replce the picture with smaller file.
Why i can't edit my post?
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