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how does michel gondry do this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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#1 nosa edamwen

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 01:43 PM

Hey all,

just saw this michel gondry advert, was wondering how this is done. Is it something done in post or on set. The focal length seems to rapidly change and the perspectives of the shot are changing.
http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

thanks in advance

Nosa
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#2 nosa edamwen

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 01:46 PM

Hey all,

just saw this michel gondry advert, was wondering how this is done. Is it something done in post or on set. The focal length seems to rapidly change and the perspectives of the shot are changing.
http://www.youtube.c...feature=related

thanks in advance

Nosa


Or is it just a vertigo effect using an arc for the track in.
but the camera does pull back and it seems to have a further effect on the perspective.
Anyway look forward to hearing from you.

cheers

Nosa
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#3 John Holland

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 01:52 PM

hi just had a look at it ! its done in post !
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#4 Rob Vogt

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 02:09 PM

Its a combination of dolly and jib moves with additional movement (or frame adjustments) added in post.
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#5 thomas-english

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 04:00 PM

If I was to do that now I would use Steadicam (although he hasn't), a bit of remote zoom and a bit of frame stretching in post.

I think he used a bit of track with a Jib arm and maybe post or maybe a subtle bit of that Dr. Who lens. Whats it called? Dinesh at panavision showed it to me. It twists a stretches the images and was used all the time on Dr. Who in the olden days. It goes in front of what ever glass your using and its massive.

Edited by thomas-english, 30 December 2009 - 04:01 PM.

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#6 Rob Vogt

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 05:40 PM

i think you're thinking of the kish optics mesmerizer.
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#7 David Rakoczy

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 07:24 PM

I wager Post. After all, look at how much they invested in the opening sequence so a little perspective shifting was probably thrown in.

btw.. the Mesmerizer would not give you that effect.. the Mesmerizer looks more like bad mushrooms... in a good way
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#8 Tim Tyler

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 12:18 AM

I suspect it was a bullet-time camera setup using Canon 5D's in video mode. That would allow for the abrupt directional changes to be created in post.

Gondry used "bullet time" on the Björk video "Army of Me" way back in 1995.
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#9 A. Whitehouse

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 02:35 AM

And more recently on another rock clip using dv cameras in a massive arc. I suspect that a lot of this was done in a similar way. Good ad, shows how vague polaroid became as a company towards the end.

I suspect it was a bullet-time camera setup using Canon 5D's in video mode. That would allow for the abrupt directional changes to be created in post.

Gondry used "bullet time" on the Björk video "Army of Me" way back in 1995.


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#10 Joshua Csehak

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 11:23 AM

My vote goes for bullet time. You can do a lot in post, but you can't change perspective like it does at :28, unless you make cgi models of the whole scene a la Avatar, and I doubt they did that.

Other possibility is that they filmed each clip going one direction, and took a short length of that and reversed it, but rotoscoped the guy from the non-reversed part. Since the background is pretty close to the same, the rotoscopy could be very forgiving. Not unlike the Kylie Minogue video he did.

I think they're doing a couple different things, actually, depending on the shot. Like at 0:40, when it jump-cuts and then switches direction, I'm bet he's rotoscoped.
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#11 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:25 PM

You can't really do bullet time with movie-mode 5Ds, attractive a possibility as it sounds, because you can't genlock them.

My impression is that it is bullet time, but some of the moves are very slow, so I suspect something small, so you can get them close together. I could be wrong. It's sufficiently subtle.

They're also clearly relying heavily on the most powerful tool in anyone's toolbox, which is an intelligent level of trickiness. A lot of that might just be dolly moves that happen to look quite a lot like the bullet time moves (although given what they had, they might also have just thrown the BT rig into position and gone with it).

P
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#12 Paul Bruening

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 02:28 PM

It's every motion trick in the book.
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#13 Chris Millar

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 07:23 PM

It's every motion trick in the book.


Yup, I'll throw in moco-swing mated with a compensating track - sort of a sideways vertigo effect....

Which could be done in post I guess, you just gotta shoot wider and deal with the resolution loss at the pinched end - 4k down to 1080 would be ample for instance
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#14 Rollin Hunt

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 08:53 PM

To me this is obviously 3D effects. UV map real images of walls and buildings onto faces in a 3D program, perhaps even from original footage with the character actually in frame. Rotoscope him so that he isn't distorted by 3D camera movements.
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#15 Chris Millar

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 12:06 AM

To me this is obviously 3D effects. UV map real images of walls and buildings onto faces in a 3D program, perhaps even from original footage with the character actually in frame. Rotoscope him so that he isn't distorted by 3D camera movements.


Sure there probably is some post involved - but 'obviously' ??

chestnut alert:

"When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail ..."
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#16 Chris Gloag

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 11:22 PM

btw.. the Mesmerizer would not give you that effect.. the Mesmerizer looks more like bad mushrooms... in a good way


Do you any links of examples shot with this lens please?
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#17 Olivier Vanaschen

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 12:04 PM

If I remember well, this was shot with two bolex 16mm cameras, probably at 90° or less a bit like they did for some scenes in Fight Club. Post production must include some kind of 3D camera mapping and post camera move. Character is rotoscoped and placed as a top layer.
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#18 Jean Dodge

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 02:23 PM

I'd say this was a short arc of multiple cameras fixed on a curved rail. Bolexes are a good bet; you could put many of them very close together, closer say than with a lot of Arri III cameras for instance. Then they all run on a shot, each with a slightly progressive focal length employed on the taking lens. Morphing is then used in post to blend the shots together.

No rotoscoping.... that's my theory.
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#19 Chris Millar

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 04:11 PM

I don't recall there being bullet time effects - why not just like I said "moco-swing mated with a compensating track - sort of a sideways vertigo effect...." ? ... or in post if you wanted.
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