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3/4 Key Light... Don't Kill My Background


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#1 Dan Witrock

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 11:44 PM

So I'm curious to any ideas for a 3/4 key light that won't fall all over my background.

In that case, I was wondering about people's expertise and advice for a light setup with very quick falloff so that it won't travel too far.

Personally I keep leaning toward the idea of bouncing an open face into some beadboard.

Any suggestions?
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#2 Tom Jensen

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 11:50 PM

So I'm curious to any ideas for a 3/4 key light that won't fall all over my background.

In that case, I was wondering about people's expertise and advice for a light setup with very quick falloff so that it won't travel too far.

Personally I keep leaning toward the idea of bouncing an open face into some beadboard.

Any suggestions?


You can raise the light and you can flag it. Bounced light is more for fill.
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#3 Vivek Marimuthu

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 10:06 AM

Hi,
If you are doing the shot in the interior, you could bounce the light from the ceiling. If you are doing the shot in the exterior, you can place the light close to the subject and bounce back on the subject... it will help redue the spill.

Vivek
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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 02:53 PM

You have to cut it as Mr. Jenson says... have some 4x4 Solids with you. Great Info Here.

Vivek, per the rules of this forum, please go to My Controls and change your screen name to your first and last name.

The Members thank you in advance.
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#5 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 06:51 PM

So I'm curious to any ideas for a 3/4 key light that won't fall all over my background.

In that case, I was wondering about people's expertise and advice for a light setup with very quick falloff so that it won't travel too far.

Personally I keep leaning toward the idea of bouncing an open face into some beadboard.

Any suggestions?



I typically use a 1K ARRI openface with a Chimera as my key light. For males, it is at the 3/4 position you speak of. For females, it is typically over the lens. In both cases, I generally want to keep it from spilling onto my background so I use a C-stand with a large solid.

So, in the 3/4 position, the flag is placed just next to the Chimera (between the light and the talent) so that it can be rotated to "cut" the light off the background but so it still hits the talent.

In the over-the-lens position, I extend the flag out horizontally over the top of the Chimera so that it can be rotated/tilted to cut the light but so that it still hits the top of her head.

I know some guys who like to use egg-crates (http://www.filmtools...60-degrees.html) instead because it saves having to carry and set up a C-stand and solids....but, I find that it doesn't cut the spill effectively enough AND it tends to cut footcandles from the key in the process. While it might be a pain to carry the extra gear, it makes a difference to do it the "right" way.

But that's just me. :)
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#6 Dan Witrock

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 06:35 PM

That's what I figured. Bouncing it is probably what I'll go for, since I'm sure the falloff must be much less bouncing into either the ceiling or some beadboard than just directly facing a chimera straight at talent. I'm just worried that in this interior setting there won't be much distance between the talent and the background and that it will be a usual cramped apartment space. And so I think bouncing and flagging as my initial intent is the best bet. Thanks for the input guys.
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#7 Vivek Marimuthu

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 12:08 PM

You have to cut it as Mr. Jenson says... have some 4x4 Solids with you. Great Info Here.

Vivek, per the rules of this forum, please go to My Controls and change your screen name to your first and last name.

The Members thank you in advance.

Hi David,
Thanks for the note. I have updated as per the forum rules...

Vivek
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#8 Vivek Marimuthu

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 12:12 PM

I did a short in a cramped apartment and the shot was of the talent looking at a string of photo negatives. A bedroom was converted to look like a photo dark room. I used a c to cut off the light from the key to the talent and bounced it from the opposite wall of the talent and another light to fill in bounced form ceiling. it kind of created a directional light effect which was required for the shot.

Vivek
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#9 David Rakoczy

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 07:47 PM

Hi Vivek. Post a screen grab when you can...
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#10 Vivek Marimuthu

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Posted 13 January 2010 - 08:06 PM

Hi Vivek. Post a screen grab when you can...


Hi,
I am not sure of making a screen grab. The whole short is just 3 min and the last sequence is what I am refering to . Can someone help tell me how to make the screen grab to help me please?

http://real-eye.blog...ng-cast-36.html
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#11 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 04:05 AM

That's what I figured. Bouncing it is probably what I'll go for, since I'm sure the falloff must be much less bouncing into either the ceiling or some beadboard than just directly facing a chimera straight at talent. I'm just worried that in this interior setting there won't be much distance between the talent and the background and that it will be a usual cramped apartment space. And so I think bouncing and flagging as my initial intent is the best bet. Thanks for the input guys.


Bounced light is far more difficult to control than a direct unit. The issue of "falloff" isn't necessarily relevant if you cut a direct source properly because, well, you're cutting it off from going anywhere near the background. All bounce will accomplish is creating a softlight that is less intense, which may or may not be enough for a proper exposure. As soon as you start bouncing light all over the place, you'll need MORE solids than you'd need by just flagging off a direct source that is pointed in a single direction.
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