Jump to content


Photo

Bloodline


  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 Nick Centera

Nick Centera
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 88 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • San Diego

Posted 15 January 2010 - 10:50 PM

Hey, so this was my first 16mm project that I had shot on my CP-16R. It was shot standard with a Zeiss 10-110 T3. I used Vision 3 500T because most of the shots were interior or at night. I ran into a few problems with the camera, but was able to get it fixed for the shoot. The shoot was barely a 2:1 shooting ratio. I used an Arri kit, that had 2 300w, 2 600w, and 1 1k. It was a very minimal kit, but I am used to using it. I also used a couple 100w bulbs in the cans you get from home depot. All the film was donated from Kodak, which is the only reason this film happened. I was so happy to get all the help I did from them and Fotokem. I definitely recommend exercising that word “student”; doors will open. I also mixed footage from the Canon A1 for shots in downtown San Diego.

Day 1: All interior stuff in a house. The actor walks through 3 separate rooms, which lead him to find the “bad guy.” For the first room where he finds pictures we shot a 1k gelled blue through the window, this didn’t even give me a reading on my meter so we gave some fill with a small light that was handheld. For close ups, we used a 100w bulb frosted pointed at the actor like the flashlight bouncing back. For the bathroom, shot the 1k w/ blue through the window and used a 300w behind the door. The bookroom we used the 1k once again for backlight moonlight. There was a bare bulb in the scene in a lamp which we used as the key, because he was kneeling right next to it. For the final room, the kitchen, once again, we shot the 1k through the window and used a 300w gelled teal as a side accent light.

Day 2: We were in an office space. Since this office space was not ours, nor were we paying for it, I could not go through and check the fluorescents that were throughout the whole office. I was worried if the fluorescents would flicker or something so for almost all of the shots, I used a 300 w/ frost on a c-stand directly above the actors. In the conference room I used the 1k as sunlight coming through even though there were windows all across the back. I was shooting on the 7219 Tungsten without a 85b filter so I wanted to try to alter any of the sunlight coming in to tungsten. I used a 600w on the opposite end of the room as fill. For the work office scene, once again I had the 300w on a c-stand. I wanted to give it a dusk feel so I put a 600w gelled with orange as backlight for him at the desk and light spilling into the room. Also down the hall, I used the 1k gelled with orange. Another 300w w/ frost was used as fill. For the final shot of the day, it was a dolly shot of the leading lady walking from an elevator down a hall. I could not have the fluorescents off or it would have looked weird, so I used 2 300w and one bounced 600w as fill light and to offset the fluorescents color. Also, since this shot was supposed to take place during the day but was the last shot well into the evening, I utilized the 1k another time putting it down the outside hall as sunlight.

Day 3: We did not get permits for the shoot so for the downtown coverage we shot on the Canon A1. Shooting digital made it quite easy to sneak the camera around and not get any trouble from people. We had to shoot a small restaurant scene and ended up only using a candle as fill for the actress’s face. The last shot downtown was in a darker place so I had to push the gain on the A1 to get a decent exposure. This is not how I wanted to shoot the scene at all, but for time constraints and not having to deal with getting shut down, digital was the best call. For the townhouse door we used the same location for day 1. This we shot on film. I tried to match the lighting as best I could from the downtown stuff. I used the 1k and a 600w both gelled orange. A 300w was used on the inside of the door for backlight and a slight silhouette.

Day 4: We had shot this basement scene previously, but the actor we had dropped out and this was when the camera began to have problems. So we re-cast then rearranged for the basement to take place on the last day. In San Diego there are no basements, so we had to cheat a garage as one. I wanted to have a yellow light coming in like there was a street lamp outside coming through windows. I set up a c-stand and put 2 100w cans gelled yellow and used screen as a scrim. There was a hanging 100w bulb, which was the key. I wanted to give the basement a hazy look but we could not afford to rent a hazer. We used a smoke machine, but the smoke was much too thick and would disperse to quickly, so we cut it all together.

The processing and transfer work was done at Fotokem in Burbank. I got a standard transfer because we were not able to afford an HD scan.

I know most of my setups are very minimal and guerilla, I am posting here so I could get any help and advice from anyone, so I would really appreciate any and all criticism or advice.

Nick

[attachment=5986:arnoldmed.jpg]

[attachment=5987:cuofautum.jpg]

[attachment=5988:cuofgirl2.jpg]

[attachment=5989:cuw_flashlight.jpg]

[attachment=5990:darksteparnold.jpg]

[attachment=5991:elevator.jpg]
  • 0


Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

The Slider

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam