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#1 Lorenzo Berti

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 01:45 PM

I'm getting ready to shoot my frist 16mm and i need some advice...please!
I will shoot a music video (for free, obviusly) and my budget is really low, so i was looking for a cheep way to light up INT scenes. what about a couple of 300W working lights?
I've been told that those lights give a color temperatur of 2800K and the film stock i will use is balanced for 3200K.
If i'd use an 82B filter to "cool down" that light and maybe correct the colors a little bit in post, will i get acceptable resoults?

I also have another question about metering. i posted it in the student section...

thank you very much guys, i love this forum!

I'm sorry i am not much of a help here though!
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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 02:05 PM

Lorenzo,

You will get good results without the filter. In this realm 400 degrees kelvin is not a lot. I would shoot without the filter and do any warming or cooling in the Transfer. Be sure to shoot a Framing Chart and a Color Chart/ Gray Scale at the head.

The book Film Lighting will be a tremendous help to you. It is the best 6-8 hours of prep you could do to deliver better images ;)
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#3 JD Hartman

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 02:59 PM

Depending on the globe in the work-light, FCL, FDN, color temp could be as 3000 or 3200. As Dave pointed out, not a problem for the film. Bigger issue in employing work-lights will be controlling and diffusing the light. Get a couple sheets or almost any type of diffusion, Opal, Frost, Tough White, etc., to clip over the fixtures. Have some flags or black card/foramcore to shape the light and control spill.
Get a few paper lanterns (12") and some 100 to 200w ordinary lightbulbs to use as your fill and backlight.

Edited by JD Hartman, 21 January 2010 - 03:01 PM.

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#4 David Rakoczy

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 03:01 PM

6ft Tracing Paper works fantastic and is cheap and available.... if (soft) light is what you want of course.
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#5 Lorenzo Berti

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 07:30 PM

6ft Tracing Paper works fantastic and is cheap and available.... if (soft) light is what you want of course.


for still photography i use that paper that goes in the oven (sorry for my english!) it works fine because it doesn't burn even if the light bulbs are really hot, what do you think? will that do?

otherwise i guess i could use white sheets

thank you so much people!
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 08:50 PM

for still photography i use that paper that goes in the oven ....


I've never heard of paper that goes in the oven. Perhaps we don't have that product here in the U.S. (Or maybe I just don't know anything about cooking). It sounds like it could be interesting.

For color, if it works fine for stills, it should work fine for motion pictures, too.




-- J.S.
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#7 Chris Millar

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 09:41 PM

for still photography i use that paper that goes in the oven (sorry for my english!) it works fine because it doesn't burn even if the light bulbs are really hot, what do you think? will that do?


Cooking/baking paper or 'grease proof paper' used around muffins for instance and with cakes to stop them burning on top before the middle is done ... :lol:

Yes, it'll work but keep an eye on it I guess - do you know about the wooden pegs also ?
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#8 Rob Vogt

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 11:06 PM

Parchment Paper is the type youre thinking of.
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 11:49 PM

Parchment paper is a pretty good idea. I think I'll give it a try and see how much abuse it can take before bursting into flames. Most parchment paper related baking doesn't go over 360 degrees. Biscuits cook at 450 degrees but for only 10 to 20 minutes.

I've got a box of it in front of me right now. There are no limits or warnings on the box.

OH, WAIT! I just opened the lid and found this warning underneath in all caps:

CAUTION: CUTTING EDGE IS SHARP, AVOID CONTACT. DO NOT TOUCH PARCHMENT PAPER TO OPEN FLAME. ALWAYS PREHEAT CONVENTIONAL OVEN FIRST. WITHSTANDS TEMPERATURES UP TO 420 DEGREES F. NEVER USE UNDER BROILER, IN TOASTER OVENS OR IN HALOGEN LIGHT OVENS. REMOVE AND DISCARD STARTER TAPE.
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#10 Lorenzo Berti

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 07:08 AM

Cooking/baking paper or 'grease proof paper' used around muffins for instance and with cakes to stop them burning on top before the middle is done ... :lol:

Yes, it'll work but keep an eye on it I guess - do you know about the wooden pegs also ?


I used wodden pegs to fix the paper on the light, yes...this is a trik that was taught to me by photographer and a good friend of mine...thinking about him makes me sad, i wonder if i ever see him again.
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#11 JD Hartman

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 12:46 PM

Are you using the "baking paper" or partchment paper on hot light or strobes? Tracing paper would be available in tablets, pads, books from an art store, artists supply. Again we're at a loss for terminology due to geographical differences. White sheets would be flammable if they were too close to the light and trapped in to much heat. Probably have to affix the fabric to a simple frame, held away from the front of the fixture. You might consider muslin, bleached or un-bleached as a diffusion material, if you can't find the tracing paper.
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#12 John Sprung

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 02:02 PM

Keeping a nice large distance between your diffusion material and the light is a good thing all around. The diffusion stays cooler, doesn't burn, lasts longer, and you get softer light.





-- J.S.
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#13 Lorenzo Berti

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 02:03 PM

Are you using the "baking paper" or partchment paper on hot light or strobes? Tracing paper would be available in tablets, pads, books from an art store, artists supply. Again we're at a loss for terminology due to geographical differences. White sheets would be flammable if they were too close to the light and trapped in to much heat. Probably have to affix the fabric to a simple frame, held away from the front of the fixture. You might consider muslin, bleached or un-bleached as a diffusion material, if you can't find the tracing paper.


i used baking paper for still photography. the inconvinience is that if you fix it too close to the light source you get harsh shadows. in order to get softer shadows i tried to move it away from the light, it works, but it is not very handy.

for my int. scene i will use 3 point lighting technique, but i will substitute the fill light with a bouncing white board
and add a light for the background.

500w key light
150w back light
100w back groundlight

the scene is setted in a pub, the performer musician is playing the guitar sitting on a stool in front of the bar giving his shoulders to the bar-girl behind. the background (where all the bottles are)is also lit by some small lights on top of the shelves

my lens is 2,5 fast and i was thinking about using 200T film stock, will i have enough light?
thank you!
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