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Lighting Stand-ins


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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 12:02 AM

It occurred to me that if I was the actor of my movie and I didn't have a crew that I was going to have trouble with lighting, framing and focus. So, I got a styrofoam, wig head. It already has a hole up through the base to put it on a stand. I got the guy at Lowes to match an 18% gray card to make up a quart of flat exterior paint. I now have something to be my 18% stand-in for lighting, framing and focus.

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#2 David Rakoczy

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 08:02 AM

The problem is Stand-Ins don't just stand... they move.
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#3 Jorge Rondao

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 08:51 AM

The problem is Stand-Ins don't just stand... they move.



It is, the problem is that the actors move on the set, and so have had to make several heads,:) :rolleyes: , but the idea of the new card 18% is funny.
Regards
Jorge
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#4 Jorge Rondao

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 08:58 AM

But watch out for unwanted reflections can occur erroneous readings, since there is not a flat surface and uniform.
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#5 David Rakoczy

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 09:11 AM

In my opinion, an Incident reading would be far more useful as a Reflected reading is only accurate off the actual object or person's skin tone which varies from item to item and person to person. I always check Reflected readings but they (rarely) decide the stop or are (rarely) used to light to a given stop.... my Incident readings do that. (as Jorge points out)
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#6 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 10:18 AM

Hmm.... it's not a bad tool to help with setting a frame, particularly for interview setups or other closeups. But it is just another thing to carry. :(
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 01:30 PM

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071249/
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 01:40 PM

To be more practical, you'll need to add bags under the eyes... ;)

With stand-ins, I sometimes find it more useful when they are less young and attractive compared to the star, that way if I get the stand-in to look good, the star looks even better under the same lighting.
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 01:41 PM

http://www.trailerfa..._garcia/trailer
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#10 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 01:44 PM

To be more practical, you'll need to add bags under the eyes... ;)

With stand-ins, I sometimes find it more useful when they are less young and attractive compared to the star, that way if I get the stand-in to look good, the star looks even better under the same lighting.


We just did a thread on art movies. What if I let my stand-in play the lead in my movie. It could be about the existential angst of being a styrofoam head. Bring Me the Thoughts of Alfredo Garcia.
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#11 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 02:04 PM

To be more practical, you'll need to add bags under the eyes... ;)

With stand-ins, I sometimes find it more useful when they are less young and attractive compared to the star, that way if I get the stand-in to look good, the star looks even better under the same lighting.


I personally find it more difficult when the stand in is 'hard to light' because I'll be setting up the lighting and looking at the person and thinking "why isn't this working?"

Then the actor steps in and looks great, but I can light faster if I know they look good right away/ don't have to trust that the actor will look better in that light.

Of course the single most important thing is if the stand in is paying attention during rehearsal - a good stand in will make your life much easier.
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#12 Tom Jensen

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 03:08 PM

To be more practical, you'll need to add bags under the eyes... ;)

With stand-ins, I sometimes find it more useful when they are less young and attractive compared to the star, that way if I get the stand-in to look good, the star looks even better under the same lighting.


I'm available.
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#13 Paul Bruening

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 06:14 PM

Jeez, guys. Someone, at least, recognize my bad joke.
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#14 Michael Collier

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 02:49 PM

Hey, I'll recognize it. I saw the pic and thought who is Alfredo Garcia. I scrolled down and I almost chuckled. It was pretty bad, but at least it was creatively so.
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FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Opal

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Technodolly