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how is this done


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#1 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 01:30 PM

hey
just wondering how this might be done?
Im guessing its super long exposure times, maybe stop motion?
its a cool video with bugs at night
take a look

video
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#2 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 01:32 PM

hmm the link isnt working
try this

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#3 Matt Read

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 03:56 PM

That's just a series of long exposures (maybe in the one to two second range) taken using an SLR or some other still camera that have been cut together.

In effect, it is much like stop motion, in that it is a series of still images shown in series. However, stop motion tries to create the illusion of smooth, realistic movement, whereas this video is much more stylized.
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#4 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:30 PM

That's just a series of long exposures (maybe in the one to two second range) taken using an SLR or some other still camera that have been cut together.

In effect, it is much like stop motion, in that it is a series of still images shown in series. However, stop motion tries to create the illusion of smooth, realistic movement, whereas this video is much more stylized.


Yeah, it is a combination of both later in the video, sort of. IMHO, they should have picked a better part of that Telefon Tel Aviv song tho, like when the "melody" kicks in.
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#5 Jean Dodge

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 09:40 PM

This is simply time lapse footage, from long exposures... longer than two seconds, I would say judging from the spirals visible from the possibly wounded bugs that are auguring in from high, creating the vertical spirals that span the full height of the frame. Maybe four to six seconds on some of the shots? The depth of field suggests that the long exposure time is compensated with a high f/stop.

There is a part toward the last where the camera pans SMOOTHLY up the telephone pole that seems like motion control, as well. The tilt up is gradual and controlled, in any case. Perhaps a geared head of some sort was employed, although it may be improvised from something simpler, and manipulated by hand between frames. A worm gear on a tilt plate would do the trick, if the operator remained vigilant and used a wrench to give the same measured turn after each shutter click.
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#6 Mike Lary

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 09:50 PM

just wondering how this might be done?
video


(from the discussion right below the video)
"I shot 156 pics at a 4 sec. exposure and edited them at 12 fps."
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#7 jacob thomas

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 02:48 AM

This is simply time lapse footage, from long exposures... longer than two seconds, I would say judging from the spirals visible from the possibly wounded bugs that are auguring in from high, creating the vertical spirals that span the full height of the frame. Maybe four to six seconds on some of the shots? The depth of field suggests that the long exposure time is compensated with a high f/stop.

There is a part toward the last where the camera pans SMOOTHLY up the telephone pole that seems like motion control, as well. The tilt up is gradual and controlled, in any case. Perhaps a geared head of some sort was employed, although it may be improvised from something simpler, and manipulated by hand between frames. A worm gear on a tilt plate would do the trick, if the operator remained vigilant and used a wrench to give the same measured turn after each shutter click.


Looks to me just like a post move. A high resolution dslr would have enough pixels.
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#8 Jean Dodge

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 09:07 AM

Looks to me just like a post move. A high resolution dslr would have enough pixels.


You may be correct, or "grammatically correct" in that on second look I can see it is not a tilt, it is a rise. A move like that could be done with a tripod that has a geared riser column that is driven by a crank. Or, like you say it was done in post production by zooming in on a frame. I think it was done with a geared riser in camera, but I am biased because that's the way I'd do it....

A few months back I even sketched out a plan for a tall twin column riser made from nesting PVC pipe that would work with dripping water to lower a camera slowly for a time lapse move that isn't a pan or a tracking shot, and doesn't require electronic motion control. Haven't built it yet, though.

In any case it's a pretty cool video.
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 09:17 AM

In any case it's a pretty cool video.


Yes.
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