Jump to content


Photo

School Lighting


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Dan Witrock

Dan Witrock

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 January 2010 - 10:55 AM

I'm shooting inside a high school and was wondering if anyone had any experience as to counteracting the overhead fluorescent lighting of a school

as in...

other options besides:

gelling the magenta or green spikes of the existing tubes

OR

replacing them with 5600' kino tubes.

Any other thoughts?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 January 2010 - 11:36 AM

Generally I swap them out, usually to the cheaper Chroma 50 tubes, not Kino 55 tubes.

But if there are hardly any windows or daylight spilling in, it would be cheaper just to gel the windows (I usually use 1/2 Plus Green) or black them out and shoot under the uncorrected fluorescents. You can use a CC Magenta filter on the camera to reduce some of the green if you feel it is necessary.

So it depends on which is easier, how many tubes there are to swap out, etc.
  • 0

#3 Dan Witrock

Dan Witrock

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 30 January 2010 - 07:01 PM

Generally I swap them out, usually to the cheaper Chroma 50 tubes, not Kino 55 tubes.

But if there are hardly any windows or daylight spilling in, it would be cheaper just to gel the windows (I usually use 1/2 Plus Green) or black them out and shoot under the uncorrected fluorescents. You can use a CC Magenta filter on the camera to reduce some of the green if you feel it is necessary.

So it depends on which is easier, how many tubes there are to swap out, etc.




Thanks David. I guess I'm leaning then towards just renting a handful of Chroma 50's then because I'm worried about some of the overhead fluorescents that already exist having a green spike and then others having a magenta spike. And so that kind of rules out gelling the windows with only one color, and also putting a filter on the camera.
  • 0

#4 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 31 January 2010 - 02:09 PM

You might check with maintenance/custodial to see if the fixtures accept T8 or T12 tubes. That will affect you options when it comes to swapping out the tubes.
  • 0

#5 michael best

michael best
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Grip
  • La/SF

Posted 31 January 2010 - 05:07 PM

If you can avoid seeing the fixtures you can bounce lights into the celling to simulate the overhead fluorescent light. But usually the best way is to switch the bulbs out.
  • 0

#6 David Rakoczy

David Rakoczy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1579 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • USA

Posted 31 January 2010 - 05:21 PM

(IRGRIP),

Per the rules of this forum, please go to My Controls and change your screen name to your first and last name.

The Members thank you in advance.
  • 0

#7 Wesley Hartshorn

Wesley Hartshorn

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 01 February 2010 - 09:49 PM

About Fluresent lighting: What are some problems you'll run into when using Tungsten 3400 to illuminate objects and subjects in your scene and also using 2 kinos for fill??

Basically I'm interested in learning more about the techniques of getting the best fill light while maintaining 3200 - 3400. Not sure if there is a unique way or if this is even possible as I'm always learning.

I thought I should mention the Camera set-up
Panasonic DVX100
Letus 35mm adapter

Any feedback from the community is much appreciated

-Wes
  • 0

#8 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 01 February 2010 - 09:51 PM

There are 3200K Kino tubes.
  • 0

#9 Wesley Hartshorn

Wesley Hartshorn

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 02 February 2010 - 09:58 AM

Thanks David, Learning about the different temperature tubes helps out a lot and answers more than just my initial question.

In your experience what has worked best for getting soft fill when using the Letus 35? The adapter stops down so much lighting that in my experience it's been difficult to get soft shadow edges without blowing out some part on the talent. Aside from the adapter question basically what techniques do you use when filling an indoor scene.

Thanks David
  • 0

#10 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 February 2010 - 11:51 AM

Thanks David, Learning about the different temperature tubes helps out a lot and answers more than just my initial question.

In your experience what has worked best for getting soft fill when using the Letus 35? The adapter stops down so much lighting that in my experience it's been difficult to get soft shadow edges without blowing out some part on the talent. Aside from the adapter question basically what techniques do you use when filling an indoor scene.

Thanks David


Not sure why the adaptor would cause an increase in contrast.
  • 0

#11 Wesley Hartshorn

Wesley Hartshorn

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 02 February 2010 - 08:02 PM

It's not the adapter that causes the increase in contrast, it's the amount of light needed
for the camera to pick up picture and give a soft fall of shadows.

So if I'm shooting a CU of a character and I want their face 1/2 lit with a soft shadow edge
on one side of their face I would need to light their face with so much light that on some parts of their face are blown out.

I was wondering if you knew of any other ways to create soft shadows using fill.

This photo gives an idea of what I'm talking about: http://farm4.static...._05f4bdf447.jpg
  • 0

#12 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 February 2010 - 08:51 PM

An adaptor cutting light doesn't increase contrast because everything is cut, both highlights and shadows. It can't somehow cut the shadows but not affect the highlights. If anything, it should be lowering contrast by washing out the image since it has to be rephotographed off of a groundglass screen.

What's just happening is that the overall image is being darkened, and you are more clearly seeing the difference between the shadows and the highlights because you can't overexpose the shot and the highlights as much, thus opening up the shadows. But the contrast is the same, just everything is overall darker.

If you need to add more fill light, you add more fill light -- there are dozens of ways to fill in a shot.

I also don't understand how the fill would make the shadows softer -- you soften a shadow by softening the key light. Unless you mean "soften" as in lighten, not make the edges of shadow patterns softer.
  • 0

#13 Wesley Hartshorn

Wesley Hartshorn

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Dayton, OH

Posted 05 February 2010 - 10:49 AM

When you explained the the overall image is being darkened and you are more clearly seeing the difference b/w the shadows and highlights that helped me to understand my basic concern. It's not so much an overexposure issue as it is decreasing the difference b/w shadow and highlights.

I'm going for a smoother transition b/w shadow and highlights. thanks for your insight
  • 0


Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineLab

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

The Slider