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An easy two-people-jumping-out-of-skyscraper-window effect......


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#1 Josh Campbell

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 06:19 PM

Is there an easy effect I can use to shoot two people jumping out of a skyscraper window when I live out in the middle of Colorado and can't afford/don't have space for a huge green screen?
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#2 Paul Bruening

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 06:45 PM

Is there an easy effect I can use to shoot two people jumping out of a skyscraper window when I live out in the middle of Colorado and can't afford/don't have space for a huge green screen?


With or without breaking glass?
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#3 Josh Campbell

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 06:54 PM

With or without breaking glass?

It would be nice with breaking glass, but the windoww can be open already/or the character can open because they need to escape from the building.
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 07:28 PM

Hmmm. High rises don't often have opening windows, anymore. Does anyone know how far back a building's design and look has to go to get windows that open?

A common approach to breaking glass is to get a character to break it out, viewed from inside with the green screen on the outside and just far enough back. If you kept the angle tight enough, the viewers would buy it and your screen wouldn't have to be huge. Then cut to an equally tight shot of the characters jumping out of frame with the same small green screen behind them. Then, it's a stills of the city skyline you need and a still of the office space.

The only thing I don't know is how well the shattering glass will behave in composite with the green screen. Someone here is bound to know that.
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#5 Josh Campbell

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 07:43 PM

Hmmm. High rises don't often have opening windows, anymore. Does anyone know how far back a building's design and look has to go to get windows that open?

A common approach to breaking glass is to get a character to break it out, viewed from inside with the green screen on the outside and just far enough back. If you kept the angle tight enough, the viewers would buy it and your screen wouldn't have to be huge. Then cut to an equally tight shot of the characters jumping out of frame with the same small green screen behind them. Then, it's a stills of the city skyline you need and a still of the office space.

The only thing I don't know is how well the shattering glass will behave in composite with the green screen. Someone here is bound to know that.

Alright. Well Thank you so much! I'll try it, and hopefully it will turn out ok.
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#6 Paul Bruening

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Posted 31 January 2010 - 10:15 PM

Alright. Well Thank you so much! I'll try it, and hopefully it will turn out ok.


Good grief, no. Don't take my word for it. Someone here has to have a better idea. Give 'em a chance to stumble across your thread.
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#7 Joe Giambrone

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:39 PM

There are several ways. I was thinking you may want to think about the angle as they break the glass. From behind would be easiest, I think. You could get from if there was a camera right outside the skyscraper on a crane shot, and that could look good, or even from ground level, or across from another building.

I know you can make a breakable (and edible) clear glass pane with sugar water. I've been wanting to try that, and actually crash through a pretty big one. Maybe someone knows where to get a really big perfectly flat tray to form it in?

For behind them, you could have them run and jump off a platform, with the green screen in front of them. Composite in a glass layer shattering out, rotoscoping out their forms. That seems simplest, to me, but not the most spectacular approach.
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#8 Josh Campbell

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 10:58 PM

For behind them, you could have them run and jump off a platform, with the green screen in front of them. Composite in a glass layer shattering out, rotoscoping out their forms. That seems simplest, to me, but not the most spectacular approach.


Hey! That's a good idea....i have a green screen too, so i'll play around with the different techniques you suggested. I'm sure if the green screen and the shattering glass doesn't work correctly, I'll have to try the composite glass. Well Thank You!
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#9 John Michael Trojan

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 08:39 PM

try checking this out for ideas... first link is the show, second is making of.




View on Vimeo
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#10 warner brown

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 04:03 AM

A B-movie way to do it is shooting the building and sky from low angle/side profile (as long as street lamps, etc aren't in view). they jump out of the window & frame.you could hold the shot, mix in a 'falling scream' sound continue after they've fallen out of frame. :P otherwise green screen of course
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Aerial Filmworks