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Bogen geared heads OK for 16mm? 3263 says 22 lbs ok


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#1 Alain Lumina

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 06:38 PM

micro-budget 16mm guy here, I love the smooth look of geared head shots, and I weighed my CP-16r at about 18lbs.

Bogen 3263 geared heads rated at 22 lbs, have little handles sticking that look similarly placed as the handles on big-time, $3000 plus heads built for 100 lb cams, but I suspect the Bogen heads are more intended for larger format still cameras; to move them between still shots.

Still, as long as there's no play in the device, would it be possible to use this for those cool slow pans you can get with a pro cine gear head?

Thanks-
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#2 William Coss

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 08:59 PM

micro-budget 16mm guy here, I love the smooth look of geared head shots, and I weighed my CP-16r at about 18lbs.

Bogen 3263 geared heads rated at 22 lbs, have little handles sticking that look similarly placed as the handles on big-time, $3000 plus heads built for 100 lb cams, but I suspect the Bogen heads are more intended for larger format still cameras; to move them between still shots.

Still, as long as there's no play in the device, would it be possible to use this for those cool slow pans you can get with a pro cine gear head?

Thanks-


I can't imagine that this is what you are really looking for.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 12:20 AM

These kind of heads don't really do the same thing as gearheads made for operating a film camera. These heads are made for use with large and heavy still camera to allow you to set a shot easily and precisely and have it hold. They don't have multiple speeds and there is wiggle when you switch directions on either movement. Both of those are pretty big cons for altering to make an operable head.
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#4 JD Hartman

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 09:50 AM

Two things that you could try: walk your camera into a Bogen dealer who has the head in stock and test drive it; email Bogen and as if the gearing is rack and pinion or worm. If it's worm gears and the head can take the weight, you may be able to adjust any slop out of the movement by adjusting the gear mesh. But as others have stated, this head is not designed for the purpose you want to put it to.
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 11:51 AM

These kind of heads don't really do the same thing as gearheads made for operating a film camera. These heads are made for use with large and heavy still camera to allow you to set a shot easily and precisely and have it hold. They don't have multiple speeds and there is wiggle when you switch directions on either movement. Both of those are pretty big cons for altering to make an operable head.

Quite right. A stills tripod is meant to hold a camera, er, still. The only friction it has is to stop the camera overbalancing, not to resist a pan or tilt.
I've looked at that head. The rack is coarse, about the same as the one on a hose clip. It's meant to be moved into position and then locked off. It won't do the job as well as a decent pan-and-tilt friction head, IMHO. $600 would go a long way towards a fluid head.
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#6 Alain Lumina

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 12:07 PM

thanks, helped me to confirm the reality no one was going to make things easy for me to get a geared head!

Quite right. A stills tripod is meant to hold a camera, er, still. The only friction it has is to stop the camera overbalancing, not to resist a pan or tilt.
I've looked at that head. The rack is coarse, about the same as the one on a hose clip. It's meant to be moved into position and then locked off. It won't do the job as well as a decent pan-and-tilt friction head, IMHO. $600 would go a long way towards a fluid head.


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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 04 February 2010 - 06:43 PM

thanks, helped me to confirm the reality no one was going to make things easy for me to get a geared head!


Unfortunately not. A gearhead is a pretty precision piece of machinery and there aren't any shortcuts. You might be able to alter one of the bogen heads and have it be satisfactory on wide lenses but as soon as you're on a long lens, every little flaw will be obvious.
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#8 Hunter Mossman

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 03:23 PM

Unfortunately when it comes to heads there's a reason the good ones are so expensive. If you want smooth pans and tilts you'll need to spend the $ to get you there. Do some comparisons. Look for a refurbished fluid head and save up. In the mean time you can always rent. You can usually get a 100mm ball mount Sachtler or Oconnor head and sticks for around $35-$50/Day. Take a look at Libec, Cartioni, and Vinten as well.
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