Jump to content


Photo

Chinese Lanterns


  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 Jase Ryan

Jase Ryan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 February 2010 - 03:52 AM

So where do you get the right Chinese lanterns for film lighting? I know you don't use the paper ones you get at the dollar stores, so what do the professionals use? And what about the bulbs???

Thanks!
  • 0

#2 Serge Teulon

Serge Teulon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London UK

Posted 03 February 2010 - 06:11 AM

So where do you get the right Chinese lanterns for film lighting? I know you don't use the paper ones you get at the dollar stores, so what do the professionals use? And what about the bulbs???

Thanks!


The paper ones do get used on professional shoots.
It all depends on the budget.

I like to put a photoflood in those.
  • 0

#3 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 03 February 2010 - 09:21 AM

I get mine from Ikea, but that's only so I can grab a cinnamon bun on the way out.
I use clear tungsten bulbs or photo floods or sometimes those new fangled halogen screw ins. Depends what I bought for the production in terms of practical bulbs.
Make sure you get a big enough lantern for the bulb you wanna use.... some of 'em get hot!
  • 0

#4 JD Hartman

JD Hartman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1690 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Edison, N.J. U.S.A.

Posted 03 February 2010 - 09:39 AM

I get mine from Ikea, but that's only so I can grab a cinnamon bun on the way out.
I use clear tungsten bulbs or photo floods or sometimes those new fangled halogen screw ins. Depends what I bought for the production in terms of practical bulbs.
Make sure you get a big enough lantern for the bulb you wanna use.... some of 'em get hot!


The paper ones from Ikea work fine, I generally stick with the two larger sizes (12", 16"?). I've put 200w tungsten and 150w medium screw base halogen bulbs in them without issues. But you get what you pay for, low purchase cost + cheap soft light = light source that is difficult to control or flag off from unwanted areas.
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 03 February 2010 - 09:42 AM

I think it's 12" and 18" but i'm not sure, from Ikea. My biggest issue with them is mounting, but that's what gaff tape is for. As for flagging/control, I use black construction paper and tape. What I like to to is buy a few of the lanters as extras so once ons is tapes to say kill the bottom 1/2 I leave it like that for duration and use it till it's to torn up to work. I think the largest I went was a 300W bulb, in the big one but, if you do this, only strike it when you're about to roll and kill it on cut so as to keep fire risks down. I have a switch wired into a few extension cords for this purpose (works great with any light!)
  • 0

#6 Jase Ryan

Jase Ryan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 February 2010 - 01:42 PM

Yeah the paper ones seem so sketchy though... is there anywhere to get ones made from a more sustainable material??
And where do you get photoflood bulbs?

Thanks!
  • 0

#7 Michael K Bergstrom

Michael K Bergstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts
  • Grip
  • Anchorage, Alaska

Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:12 PM

Chimera makes lanterns, their pancakes are nice too, here's a link http://www.chimerali...om/lanterns.asp. Kind of the same light spread as a paper lantern.
  • 0

#8 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19761 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:45 PM

Paper lanterns are nice and cheap. There are more expensive types made from fabric. Chimera, JEM, etc.

You get photofloods and photo enlarger bulbs (211, 212, 213) from camera supply stores and expendable supply stores, or online. But there are regular light bulbs sold up to 300w too.
  • 0

#9 Serge Teulon

Serge Teulon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 757 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London UK

Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:46 PM

Definitely get the larger of the paper lanterns, as Adrian has pointed out.

In the UK you can get the bulbs from here

As for controlling them, nothing like some black duvateyn (not sure if spelt right) and/or black wrap.
  • 0

#10 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19761 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:52 PM

I find duvetine cloth too heavy to hang on one side of a lantern without it tipping in that direction.

What I like to use is this thin black plastic tablecloth material you can get at any cooking supply store like Smart & Final.
  • 0

#11 Marc Roessler

Marc Roessler
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 264 posts
  • Other

Posted 03 February 2010 - 03:46 PM

I've successfully used as much as 1000 watts in 23" china balls.
I'd keep an eye on them then and not run them for extended periods, though.
You don't need to switch them off after every take, but I wouldn't keep them on for hours.
Also don't cover the top and bottom hole so natural air convection won't be hindered.
At those power levels you also have to be a bit careful with flagging (or even spraying!) them black,
because this is what will absorb heat radiation and thus burn them up.

You hear the paper crackling from the evaporating residue humidity when you switch the lamp on... :ph34r:

Greetings,
Marc
  • 0

#12 Jase Ryan

Jase Ryan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 03 February 2010 - 04:54 PM

It makes sense not to cover the top to keep airflow going, but are you saying not to cover the bottom either? is this with any size bulbs or only 1000W? Because that would kinda be bad if there was a harder spot coming straight down!
  • 0

#13 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 04 February 2010 - 03:25 AM

Here ya go: http://www.filmtools...all-system.html

I really like the Lanterlock fixtures, they make it easy to rig them anywhere you want with standard grip gear. They are also a lot safer than having a free hanging fixture inside. You can always build your own if you're electrically inclined. I like the 24" and 12" sizes, wrap them in blackwrap or pin some duvetyne to the outside to control the spill.

Paper lanterns are cheap and work well, they'll get trashed after a few shoots anyway so just buy more for a few bucks. If you want something built to last, the Chimera pancake lanterns are the way to go. A lot more expensive though.

*I always keep china balls on a hand squeezer (500w dimmer) and turn them off whenever they're not in use.

Edited by Satsuki Murashige, 04 February 2010 - 03:26 AM.

  • 1

#14 Jamie Sides

Jamie Sides

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Washington, DC

Posted 27 February 2010 - 01:59 PM

I prefer the quality of light from the paper lanterns to a chimera. I got a dozen or so a few years back from here: http://asianideas.co...erlanterns.html

Filmtools has them: http://www.filmtools.com/chinlan.html

Regular photo floods get extremely hot, so I’ve started getting these and they’re great-they are much larger than a regular photo flood. I’d recommend at least a 30” lantern.

Eiko sp85 50 med: http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B000IBQ68G

I go to home depot, buy ceramic sockets, and ungrounded stingers (I’m not an electrician so that’s probably bad advice), cut off the female end and assemble the socket to the cable.
  • 0

#15 Jim Menkol

Jim Menkol
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Student

Posted 27 February 2010 - 10:36 PM

I generally a 250 or 500 in any paper China, even if it's 36".
  • 0

#16 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 February 2010 - 02:36 AM

I find duvetine cloth too heavy to hang on one side of a lantern without it tipping in that direction.

What I like to use is this thin black plastic tablecloth material you can get at any cooking supply store like Smart & Final.


The ikea china balls are cheap enough that I got a bunch and spraypainted some of them for spill control. I have a few that have the top half spraypainted flat black. A few have one side hemisphere painted black. It's not the same as a skirt but it saves you from having quite so much fabric or blackwrap hanging there.
  • 0

#17 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 February 2010 - 12:45 PM

The ikea china balls are cheap enough that I got a bunch and spraypainted some of them for spill control. I have a few that have the top half spraypainted flat black. A few have one side hemisphere painted black. It's not the same as a skirt but it saves you from having quite so much fabric or blackwrap hanging there.

What kind of paint are you using Chris? Some kind of non-flammable variety?
  • 0

#18 Isabelle Landers

Isabelle Landers

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Electrician

Posted 04 March 2010 - 10:06 PM

Regular photo floods get extremely hot, so I’ve started getting these and they’re great-they are much larger than a regular photo flood. I’d recommend at least a 30” lantern.

Eiko sp85 50 med: http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B000IBQ68G

I go to home depot, buy ceramic sockets, and ungrounded stingers (I’m not an electrician so that’s probably bad advice), cut off the female end and assemble the socket to the cable.


This post gives me an idea. I love the quality of Helium balloon lights but they are too expensive for anything but a feature budget. To create a poor mans version of a helium balloon I have thought about using a large paper china lantern (48”) and the 200 Watt 8u CFL bulbs pictured below in the fixture pictured below.

http://img.tradekey....70423031229.jpg

http://www.inspironp...i...mage&pID=51

With this fixture, I can cluster nine of the 200W CFL together and produce the tungsten equivalent of a 7650W Tungsten balloon. Since CFLs generate hardly any heat there is no fire hazard. The CFL bulbs will pull around 15 amps total so shouldn’t overload the fixture or a standard household circuit. For night exteriors I can lamp it with 5000K CFL bulbs and power it with a portable generator and still have enough power on the generator to run several small HMIs and as well. Does anyone see any reason this setup wouldn't work?

- Isabelle Landers, Gaffer, Nashua, NH
  • 0

#19 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 04 March 2010 - 10:23 PM

Genny could cause flicker or fry the ballasts of 'em, also they won't like being too cold. I've used CFLs that just won't strike well, or at all, below 40f. Aside from that, not really. Biggest issue would be getting it up as high as easily as a helium balloon light.
  • 0

#20 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 05 March 2010 - 12:51 AM

What kind of paint are you using Chris? Some kind of non-flammable variety?


Just plain old cheap flat black spraypaint. This is for about 300W and down, so I can't really comment on how flame retardant the paint is or isn't.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

CineTape

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Opal

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

CineTape

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Technodolly