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#1 Alex Zustra

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 06:10 PM

Ok, here goes. Answers to any question much appreciated.

1. I do a decent amount of shooting regattas (sailboat racing), We are looking for some sort of stabilization method, since we shoot from a powerboat to get around the course. Any recommendations or suggestions? Is a plain old glidecam or steadicam all we need, or something more specialized?

2. Is there a site that lists camera equipment and/or lighting diagrams used on particular films?

3. Somewhat similar, is there a site that has comparisons between different lenses/cameras/formats? CML does this to an extent. I don't have access to a lot of equipment, so I'd like to be able to see and compare images captured with different equipment.
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#2 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 06:25 PM

Ok, here goes. Answers to any question much appreciated.

1. I do a decent amount of shooting regattas (sailboat racing), We are looking for some sort of stabilization method, since we shoot from a powerboat to get around the course. Any recommendations or suggestions? Is a plain old glidecam or steadicam all we need, or something more specialized?


I've tried Steadicam on a boat. It's not good enough especially on choppy water. I've heard of Perfect Horizon http://www.motionpic...bilization.html which I'll try out the next time a "boat" job comes up.
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#3 Michael Collier

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 06:31 PM

1: look into a mako head, it might be just the thing you need. Mako Head

2: American Cinematographer articles usually state the camera, lens and stocks for the film in question, and sometimes provides lighting diagrams. Rodger Deakin's site at one time had a few lighting diagrams, but I am not sure if he still has those after his site went down, something to check on.

3: I know I have seen camera tests online that would give some idea, but I think your looking for side by side comparison. Other than ASC's shootout, I don't know of any side by side, apples to apples comparison available. I am not even sure if you can get ASC's test on DVD yet. Last I heard it was only played in large screenings at ASC functions.
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 05 February 2010 - 06:50 PM

This might sound a little crazy. Think about it first before you automatically reject it:

A steadicam is made to compensate for the bobs and shakes of a walking human, not a powerboat skipping wakes and crossing chop. As well, a powerboat is made to crease the water in order to pass over it efficiently. That means it has to stay on top of chop which makes it bounce too violently for a smooth camera shot.

Wouldn't a wider footprint help? Let's say, a catamaran? Pull the mast and rigging off. Install some cross-bracing and hang a passably fast but not insanely heavy outboard on the new bracing. Now, you've got a wide footprint boat that can take some flat decking installations, and have the kind of bows that pierce through chop instead of bounce over. Then maybe a steadicam.
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#5 Alex Zustra

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 03:56 PM

Thanks for the responses guys.

To Paul, (I forgot to mention this initially, but..) we've realized that the powerboat isn't ideal, but our budget is limited to our bank accounts, since we have yet to break even on DVD sales/other income. We certainly can't afford a new boat, nor chartering one for each regatta.

Also, we do like to try moving shots, but for the most part we set anchor at the rounding points and shoot.

To others, thanks again and I'll look into the Mako head and perfect horizon, I haven't checked the links yet so I don't know if they'll be financially possible.

-Alex

Edited by Alex Zustra, 06 February 2010 - 03:59 PM.

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#6 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 05:47 PM

Another idea just occurred to me...

what about one of those RC helicopters like this?: http://www.rchelisit...videography.php

http://rchelitoy.com...ck2-300x225.jpg

You could use the chase boat to stay close to the helicopter and it would give you a variety of angles on the action assuming it doesn't take swim before you get the tape out. :)
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 05:56 PM

Another idea just occurred to me...

what about one of those RC helicopters like this?: http://www.rchelisit...videography.php

http://rchelitoy.com...ck2-300x225.jpg

You could use the chase boat to stay close to the helicopter and it would give you a variety of angles on the action assuming it doesn't take swim before you get the tape out. :)


...or get swept into someone's rigging. That'd make for an interesting rules calling from the officials.
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#8 Paul Bruening

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 06:12 PM

How's about this for a helicopter/sailing combination:

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  • apocalypse_sloops.jpg

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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 06:15 PM

...and before you put it in and break it off:

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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 02:04 AM

Actually it's spelled Wagner. He was kinda the Andrew Lloyd Weber of 19th century Germany. ;-)





-- J.S.
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#11 Paul Bruening

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 02:20 AM

Actually it's spelled Wagner. He was kinda the Andrew Lloyd Weber of 19th century Germany. ;-)





-- J.S.


Right. Right. I was so busy patting myself on the back for the slopes/sloops pun that I didn't proof read the bubble. Even the Wagner picture couldn't make me feel any less sthupit.
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