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300ft short end into a 200ft mag?


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#1 Garry Torrance

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 08:24 AM

Hi folks,

I'm going to be shooting a low-budget, self-funded documentary project on a Konvas 35mm camera which only takes 200ft mags. I'll be doing the loading myself.
For the film, I acquired a box of 35mm short-ends from a commercials company but most of them are longer than 200ft. Can anyone advise as to the most practical way to split, for example, a 300ft roll into two 150ft rolls, both onto cores ready for loading? And what are the potential downfalls (other than me ending up wrapped head-to-toe in masses of fogged film)?

Thanks in advance,
Garry
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#2 Mike Lary

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 08:50 AM

I would ask a lab to do it for me. I've done that with 400 rolls that needed to be on 100 foot spools. They'll probably charge you a small fee or ask that you send the film to them for processing (in which case the downspooling would be free). There are threads here on how to do it yourself. In addition to fogging the film you could also introduce dust or other foreign particles into the film (and camera) or you could wind the film too tight (which would cause kinks in the film that end up looking like lightning flashes across the frame). It would be worth the small investment to have a lab do it considering the margin for error.
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 09:23 AM

Hi folks,

I'm going to be shooting a low-budget, self-funded documentary project on a Konvas 35mm camera which only takes 200ft mags. I'll be doing the loading myself.
For the film, I acquired a box of 35mm short-ends from a commercials company but most of them are longer than 200ft. Can anyone advise as to the most practical way to split, for example, a 300ft roll into two 150ft rolls, both onto cores ready for loading? And what are the potential downfalls (other than me ending up wrapped head-to-toe in masses of fogged film)?

Thanks in advance,
Garry



I would second Mike's recommendations. If they screw it up, they will replace it, especially if they are doing the processing and tk. I am wondering if you are shooting dialogue on the Konvas and if so, how are you going about it. I ask because I am producing a similar project (self funded doc) and am looking at creative ways to shoot it.
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#4 Garry Torrance

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 09:24 AM

Thanks, I'll find out what the lab can offer.

Best,
Garry
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#5 SAMMY VASSILEV

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 09:27 AM

Garry,

If you get a 400FT mag would be the best! Konvas does take 400ft mags! You can buy very inexpensively one on ebay. This way you will not have to touch the film while respooling at all, which keeps all the dirt out. I've divided film in the past and it turned out to be a mistake. Took me a long time and I did ruin shots due to dust and particles.

Sammy
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#6 Garry Torrance

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 09:31 AM

Chris,

Most of the voice recordings are being taken from interviews that have already been filmed on video and will be presented as voice-overs with the 35mm footage, although there may be some sync-sound material: this will be filmed on S16mm on a sync-sound camera (Arri SR2). The project will be finishing on digital media, so I'm looking at mixing 35mm, S16mm and S8mm.
I can't wait ;-)

Garry
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#7 SAMMY VASSILEV

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 09:32 AM

I would second Mike's recommendations. If they screw it up, they will replace it, especially if they are doing the processing and tk. I am wondering if you are shooting dialogue on the Konvas and if so, how are you going about it. I ask because I am producing a similar project (self funded doc) and am looking at creative ways to shoot it.


Hello Chris,

This is Sammy responding to your sound question! I own 3 Konvas cameras. Depending on the camera some are quieter then the others. I've shot sound with Konvas used longer lenses and had a sound blimp over it. It worked pretty well. I built the sound blimp with a box and foam and then split it in 2. Basically it looked like a mold with a hole for the lens. Worked very well.

Sammy
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#8 Garry Torrance

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 10:40 AM

Sammy, your blimp sounds interesting, I was considering putting up a post to find out if anyone had built a blimp for a Konvas camera, I may give it a try.

I'll also check out the price/availability of 400ft mags.

Thanks,
Garry
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