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Quick Question about ASA


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#1 James Onn

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 11:00 AM

Hi,

Basicly I have just got my new Super-8 Camera through the post and it says that the 4 types of film it takes are :

25D 100D 40T 160T

Now I was thinking about buying Some Kodak Tri-X 200D Super-8 Film but I was wondering what steps I would need to take or if it is even possible (or at least advisable) to use this film With this camera.

Am I correct in thinking that it bay become over exposed? - I was however planing to shoot in low light, / shade.

Finally I would just like to request any general tips for selecting super-8 film, and how to generally work with using the same film for multiple conditions (outside daylight, inside, night, etc...)

Thanks in advance.

- James
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 11:56 AM

Does your camera allow manual exposure?
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#3 Chris Burke

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 02:18 PM

Hi,

Basicly I have just got my new Super-8 Camera through the post and it says that the 4 types of film it takes are :

25D 100D 40T 160T

Now I was thinking about buying Some Kodak Tri-X 200D Super-8 Film but I was wondering what steps I would need to take or if it is even possible (or at least advisable) to use this film With this camera.

Am I correct in thinking that it bay become over exposed? - I was however planing to shoot in low light, / shade.

Finally I would just like to request any general tips for selecting super-8 film, and how to generally work with using the same film for multiple conditions (outside daylight, inside, night, etc...)

Thanks in advance.

- James



what is the make and model of your camera?
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#4 Jim Carlile

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 04:37 AM

If your camera can read 160T, just cut a filter notch in the cartridge so that the camera's filter pin will stay out

Without the notch, Tri-X will push in the filter pin, causing the camera to set the meter at ASA 100, which is one stop overexposed. With the filter pin out the meter will rate it at ASA 160 -- much better.

The same is true of VISION 200.

On some cameras the notch will make no difference, because they don't do the automatic 2/3 stop kickdown-- newer ones, especially. But just to be sure, cut a notch.

With Tri-X you don't need an 85 filter, so keep the filter switch set to bulb. It'll give you more sensitivity in low light situations.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Metropolis Post