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Need New Cam Recomendation!


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#1 JIM STALEY

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 06:38 PM

We are a non-profit organization that is need of a new camera. Our budget is under 5k. Most of the time, it will be used on a tripod in indoor lighting to low light. On occasion throughout the year it will be used outdoors as a shoulder cam. We are torn between whether or not we want a full tape cam, a tape and flash cam or a solid state cam. WE have been looking at the Sony HXR-NX5U, the Sony z5u, the Canon XH A1 and XH G1. Is there any draw backs to going completely tapeless? It is a very attractive idea for us to shoot for hours straight and then just dump onto a hard drive.

Thanks for your help!

JIM
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 12:13 AM

We are a non-profit organization that is need of a new camera. Our budget is under 5k. Most of the time, it will be used on a tripod in indoor lighting to low light. On occasion throughout the year it will be used outdoors as a shoulder cam. We are torn between whether or not we want a full tape cam, a tape and flash cam or a solid state cam. WE have been looking at the Sony HXR-NX5U, the Sony z5u, the Canon XH A1 and XH G1. Is there any draw backs to going completely tapeless? It is a very attractive idea for us to shoot for hours straight and then just dump onto a hard drive.

Thanks for your help!

JIM


What exactly are you shooting? The main drawback of shooting tapeless is that the failure rate of hard drives is higher than that of tapes. On average, 1 in 14 new hard rives will fail within a year. I don't know the failure rate of tapes but I have never encountered a bad tape in thousands of tapes per year for the last 6 years.

The other drawback is archival stability. If you're shooting tapeless, your archives will need to be backed up (twice preferably) and the drives replaced and the file formats checked and possibly updated every 3 to 5 years forever. Archiving on tape should be much less work and expense.
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#3 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 01:02 AM

What exactly are you shooting? The main drawback of shooting tapeless is that the failure rate of hard drives is higher than that of tapes. On average, 1 in 14 new hard rives will fail within a year. I don't know the failure rate of tapes but I have never encountered a bad tape in thousands of tapes per year for the last 6 years.

The other drawback is archival stability. If you're shooting tapeless, your archives will need to be backed up (twice preferably) and the drives replaced and the file formats checked and possibly updated every 3 to 5 years forever. Archiving on tape should be much less work and expense.



Good considerations. I would add that you might find yourself extremely pleased with a camera such as Panasonic's DVX-100B
which is a Mini-DV camera that offers a lot of nice features and can be picked up new for about two grand, which would leave you
with money for equipment such as a good tripod,lights, microphones, etc..

This is an SD camera but that might might be suitable for your purposes. It certainly is a good camera and does well in low light.
Some of the HD/HDV cameras under $5K are tough to use in lower light. I've shot a lot of tv stuff with the DVX-100 series and like
it a lot. The DVX-100B does well with 6db of gain.
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#4 JIM STALEY

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 12:18 PM

Good considerations. I would add that you might find yourself extremely pleased with a camera such as Panasonic's DVX-100B
which is a Mini-DV camera that offers a lot of nice features and can be picked up new for about two grand, which would leave you
with money for equipment such as a good tripod,lights, microphones, etc..

This is an SD camera but that might might be suitable for your purposes. It certainly is a good camera and does well in low light.
Some of the HD/HDV cameras under $5K are tough to use in lower light. I've shot a lot of tv stuff with the DVX-100 series and like
it a lot. The DVX-100B does well with 6db of gain.


Most of what we shoot will be studio type teachings or pulpit teachings as well as conference settings. I am strongly leaning toward the Sony z5u, which allows me to record to both tape and flash and has a low lux of 1.5, which I've been told is very good.
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