Jump to content


Photo

The White Ribbon


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 georg lamshöft

georg lamshöft
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 310 posts
  • Berlin

Posted 17 February 2010 - 06:48 AM

I'll try to catch up with all the movies I missed and got some "oscar-buzz".

I just saw "Das weiße Band" / "The White Ribbon" by Michael Haneke and photographed by Christian Berger.

It was a quite expensive movie by German standards (~€12m) and I liked the not very known aspect of small-village society before WW1 (and a portray of the youth which later was responsible for the holocaust) with some interesting scenes. But it wasn't a very exciting movie, too busy avoiding classic dramaturgy. Acting, cinematography and production design was ok but not more.

First I thought the academy appreciates a very classic cinematography with "2D-B/W" in contrast to "colour-3D" ;-)
But as I later found out, it wasn't classic at all: they shot it on color stock, made a DI and turned it B/W while heavily manipulating the "look". And this is all what they came up with 15 years after Kaminskis' "Schindlers List" (real B/W)?

What have I missed?
  • 0

#2 Jason Reimer

Jason Reimer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 152 posts
  • Student
  • Rochester, NY

Posted 31 January 2011 - 02:02 AM

I'll try to catch up with all the movies I missed and got some "oscar-buzz".

I just saw "Das weiße Band" / "The White Ribbon" by Michael Haneke and photographed by Christian Berger.

It was a quite expensive movie by German standards (~€12m) and I liked the not very known aspect of small-village society before WW1 (and a portray of the youth which later was responsible for the holocaust) with some interesting scenes. But it wasn't a very exciting movie, too busy avoiding classic dramaturgy. Acting, cinematography and production design was ok but not more.

First I thought the academy appreciates a very classic cinematography with "2D-B/W" in contrast to "colour-3D" ;-)
But as I later found out, it wasn't classic at all: they shot it on color stock, made a DI and turned it B/W while heavily manipulating the "look". And this is all what they came up with 15 years after Kaminskis' "Schindlers List" (real B/W)?

What have I missed?


I finally remembered to order this on Netflix, and I really, really loved the lighting. Interiors were pretty soft and naturalistic, and the exterior scenes definitely looked lit, but again, in a soft and somewhat naturalistic style. I would agree, it definitely looked like it had a touch of Sven Nyquvist to it, especially those exterior scenes. I'm with you, Georg, I'd like to see something like this shot on actual black and white film, but hey, at least it was presented in black and white! Right before commenting here I was reading David's comments on the Wally Pfister lighting thread, and I thought, I'd love to see Wally's style translated into black and white. There were a few interior scenes in The White Ribbon that had some soft, toppy sources, which is what made me connect the two in my mind. Anyway, the storytelling style of this film might not be everyone's cup of tea, but I really enjoyed the cinematography, and at the very least I think most forum members here would appreciate the lighting. There were several times that I thought, man, I'd like to get ahold of the the negatives and make some prints in the darkroom to hang on my wall. :)
  • 0

#3 Frank Glencairn

Frank Glencairn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 138 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Germany

Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:52 AM

I think that scene, where the wive of the farmer died and he stands at her bed was nothing but great - also when the father (pastor) spanks his son behind that closed door was extremely immersive , especially because it is all in our head - you just see that door.

In my book, the white ribbon is one of the best German films in the last years.

Frank
  • 0

#4 Hampus Bystrom

Hampus Bystrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 132 posts
  • Student
  • Stocktown

Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:02 PM

I always find Haneke's films to be so disturbing that I almost repress them... Which is a good thing, I love movies that have that visceral effect on you. I mean I saw the film at least half a year ago, and I still don't know what to make of it
  • 0


Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Opal

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Opal

The Slider

Glidecam