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Correct exposure of Vision 2 200T in daylight


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#1 Marc Oberdorfer

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:42 AM

OK, I'm not a newbie to photography and filming, however I simply can't wrap my head around this issue.

I have a Beaulieu 6008s and Kodak Vision 2 200T film stock which is balanced for tungsten lighting. I will be shooting a short film very soon with both in and outdoor scenes.
I understand that for outdoor scenes I have to use a 85/85B filter and the 200T will be rated at 125 ASA. The only thing which I can't figure out is which stop on the ASA adjustment wheel on the 6008s is ASA125. Can't find any valid information on this in the manual, it's just not described what ASA speeds the stops are which are not labeled.

To make this more clear, the ASA dial has markings for ASA 12, 20, 40, 80, 160 and 400.
From ASA 12 to 160 there are two additional marked stops in between each full stop, from ASA 160 to 400 there are three additional stop markings in between.
Does that mean 1/3rd stop increments and 1/4th stop increments? If so it would mean that 1 mark before ASA 160 is ASA 125. Is that correct or am I totally off?

Edited by Marc Oberdorfer, 18 February 2010 - 04:45 AM.

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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 04:57 AM

OK, I'm not a newbie to photography and filming, however I simply can't wrap my head around this issue.

I have a Beaulieu 6008s and Kodak Vision 2 200T film stock which is balanced for tungsten lighting. I will be shooting a short film very soon with both in and outdoor scenes.
I understand that for outdoor scenes I have to use a 85/85B filter and the 200T will be rated at 125 ASA. The only thing which I can't figure out is which stop on the ASA adjustment wheel on the 6008s is ASA125. Can't find any valid information on this in the manual, it's just not described what ASA speeds the stops are which are not labeled.

To make this more clear, the ASA dial has markings for ASA 12, 20, 40, 80, 160 and 400.
From ASA 12 to 160 there are two additional marked stops in between each full stop, from ASA 160 to 400 there are three additional stop markings in between.
Does that mean 1/3rd stop increments and 1/4th stop increments? If so it would mean that 1 mark before ASA 160 is ASA 125. Is that correct or am I totally off?


Those are marked in 1/3 stop increments. Above 160 is 200, 250, 320 and then 400. 125asa is the mark in-between 100 and 160.
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#3 Marc Oberdorfer

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 06:06 AM

Those are marked in 1/3 stop increments. Above 160 is 200, 250, 320 and then 400. 125asa is the mark in-between 100 and 160.


Thanks Chris this is very helpful, so I was right after all on the 125asa mark.

Edited by Marc Oberdorfer, 18 February 2010 - 06:07 AM.

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#4 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 06:28 PM

The film itself is ASA 200, but there is no ASA 200 cartridge notch in the Super8 system, but 160. The Vision 2 200T will then be read as ASA 160 without filter in Super8, and as an ASA 100 with the filter 85 enabled. Set the ASA dial to 160 or even lower, because Kodak recommends to overexpose these negative stocks even 1 stop or more for better results...
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#5 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 01:11 PM

The ASA notch shouldn't matter if you can set your own ASA. You need to use an external filter, any internal filter is disabled with those neg carts. You don't need to compensate for the filter because the TTL meter will do that. You can set it at 200ASA for a standard low con image, or over expose by 1/3-2/3rds for added density, tighter grain, punchier color, by rating it at 125 or 160ASA.
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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 11:46 PM

The best thing to do on that camera with V200 is just set the ASA for 100 and don't worry about an 85 filter. Any daylight color cast can be removed in post.

If you really want to use an external filter, then ASA 100 will provide the right amount of slight overexposure. Kodak even recommends a full one-stop over, which is why they set up the cartridge to rate V200T at ASA 100 with no filter.

There's lots of latitude with that film.
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#7 Miguel Loredo

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:10 PM

Kodak even recommends a full one-stop over, which is why they set up the cartridge to rate V200T at ASA 100 with no filter.


As far as I knew, V 200T is notched as a 160T/100D and to "disable the filter" because it's more professional to use an external filter on the lens rather than the internal one...
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#8 Justin Donoghue

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 01:23 PM

I didn't have an external filter so I cut a notch in the cartridge so that the internal filter could be used.....got me out of a hole.
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#9 Will Montgomery

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 10:32 AM

The best thing to do on that camera with V200 is just set the ASA for 100 and don't worry about an 85 filter. Any daylight color cast can be removed in post.

I think it's best to get as close to the look you want in camera as reasonably possible. He may not be working with the best colorists in the business or have the skills to adjust properly in post. Most colorists I work with seem to appreciate that too. BUT, I know a ton of shooters that don't think about daylight/tungsten at all and do just fine.
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#10 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 08 April 2010 - 04:18 AM

I think it's best to get as close to the look you want in camera as reasonably possible. He may not be working with the best colorists in the business or have the skills to adjust properly in post. Most colorists I work with seem to appreciate that too. BUT, I know a ton of shooters that don't think about daylight/tungsten at all and do just fine.


Didn't Pro-8mm take out the internal 85 filters when they were modding older Canon 1014 cameras? If so, they did this knowing that people would be shooting the Vision stocks both indoors and outdoors.
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#11 Larry Wilson

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 09:56 PM

The ASA notch shouldn't matter if you can set your own ASA. You need to use an external filter, any internal filter is disabled with those neg carts. You don't need to compensate for the filter because the TTL meter will do that. You can set it at 200ASA for a standard low con image, or over expose by 1/3-2/3rds for added density, tighter grain, punchier color, by rating it at 125 or 160ASA.


One question about that:

Are the results of removing the color cast in post just as good as if you actually used an 85 (or 85B, as the case may be) filter?
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#12 Larry Wilson

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 10:01 PM

Didn't Pro-8mm take out the internal 85 filters when they were modding older Canon 1014 cameras? If so, they did this knowing that people would be shooting the Vision stocks both indoors and outdoors.


Their rationale for doing it was that the internal 85 filters were the weakest link in the optical chain. They were usually made of either inferior glass or flimsy plastic. Both the Pro814 and the Pro1014 come with screw-on 85 filters. I think in their literature they were claiming about a 20-25% increase in sharpness with the internal filter out of the way.
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#13 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 11:14 PM

One question about that:

Are the results of removing the color cast in post just as good as if you actually used an 85 (or 85B, as the case may be) filter?



I have found in the past that an overcast sky (white or hazy white skys) might wreak havoc when an 85 filter is not used. However, this was true of reversal film, and I am not sure if it is as true, or true at all for negative stocks, especially if the transfer is being done by a good colorist.

Any opinions?
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#14 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 11:31 PM

Not as true for negative. It has a lot more range of both exposure and color "information" that it can capture, and in the hands of a good colorist you can get good results without the 85. Skylight, though, such as that from overcast skies, will even look "bluer" on daylight film as it's much higher in color temperature (normally around 6500-10000+K) .
And, despite that it can be "fixed in post," it's almost always best to use the 85 when you can (though I've been guilty of pulling it out on occasion).
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