Jump to content


Photo

Car Window Reflections


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Dan Witrock

Dan Witrock

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 February 2010 - 04:01 PM

I'm shooting a short film soon in the desert and am worried about doing hood mount shots. I'm worried about looking straight into the car in order to get a 2-shot of the driver and passengers in the front seats of a truck and not seeing the camera looking right back at us. Any suggestions? The truck isn't going to be towed, so we can't just create a tent over the entire hood.
And I'm afraid a polarizer won't take off much of the reflection being that the camera will be sitting probably in broad daylight or at least hit entirely from the side since we'll be shooting at morning and in the afternoon.

I appreciate any suggestions.
  • 0

#2 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 25 February 2010 - 01:13 AM

I'm shooting a short film soon in the desert and am worried about doing hood mount shots. I'm worried about looking straight into the car in order to get a 2-shot of the driver and passengers in the front seats of a truck and not seeing the camera looking right back at us. Any suggestions? The truck isn't going to be towed, so we can't just create a tent over the entire hood.
And I'm afraid a polarizer won't take off much of the reflection being that the camera will be sitting probably in broad daylight or at least hit entirely from the side since we'll be shooting at morning and in the afternoon.

I appreciate any suggestions.


You don't normally see the camera since windshields are angled. You can use a polarizer and dial out as much of the reflections you want.
  • 0

#3 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 25 February 2010 - 09:17 AM

Don't forget Polas work in relation to angle of the sun, so try to keep your car @ a 90 degree path to it for maximum pola effect.
  • 0

#4 Jeff Kolada

Jeff Kolada
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 46 posts
  • Student
  • Columbus/Athens, OH

Posted 03 March 2010 - 09:36 PM

Most vehicles you wouldn't have a problem with reflection of the camera, unless it is a jeep or something where the windshield is fairly flat. You'd probably have to worry about reflection of the sky and clouds more than anything, and a polarizer is your best bet. You'll just have to figure out the angle that works best. And yes, you're right that a pola won't remove 100% of reflections, but when it's sky reflecting, sometimes thats nice to have a little bit of.

That is unless you can replace the glass with non-reflective UV-coated glass. It would be much more expensive depending on your budget, but from what I can tell, many feature films do not use stock windshields on cars for shots through windshields. Or they don't use windshields at all.

On that note, you may think about having a two-shot across the characters instead of straight on if the reflections become a big problem. (Probably a bit wider than this, but you get the idea)
Posted Image
  • 0

#5 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 03 March 2010 - 11:00 PM

That is unless you can replace the glass with non-reflective UV-coated glass. It would be much more expensive depending on your budget, but from what I can tell, many feature films do not use stock windshields on cars for shots through windshields. Or they don't use windshields at all.


Most feature films use the windshield that comes with the car. I've never worked on a film that replaced the windshield or taken one out. I have seen the rear view mirror removed which I absolutely hate. You pretty much set the pola and go. Not you don't normally dial out the entire reflection because the reflection looks natural. You just want to be able to see the actors.
  • 0

#6 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 04 March 2010 - 12:31 AM

If you're on a process trailer, an 8x solid can be tabletopped over the windshield and it will kill sky reflections. You can also use your choice of net to knock those reflections down but not completely kill them.
  • 0

#7 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 March 2010 - 04:20 AM

The pola works extremely well on daylight shots, I usually like leaving some reflections, but it does depend on the scene.

On side shots you can always wind the door window down, although the sound department mightn't too happy if there is dialogue. Even though the door glass you'll probably be shooting at an angle to the glass rather than straight on, so shouldn't catch the camera reflection.
  • 0

#8 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 05 March 2010 - 02:43 AM

You can use that pola creatively, as well. One of my best shots was shooting through glass at two girls. I turned the pola revealing the boyfriend in the reflection, standing outside
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Technodolly

The Slider

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Visual Products