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Eclair Messed Up


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#1 ben goldberg

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 03:49 PM

I shot a 100' foot roll the other day on the NPR and when I got it back the negative was just one big blur all the way down the film.

It seems to me that the claw was not hitting the sprocket holes.

And the little wheel frame thing on the left didnt seem to work either.

Could this camera have been missing the reg pin or what? Could be a possibility since I checked it out from san francisco state university.

Either way it really **(obscenity removed)**in sucks
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#2 Ian Cooper

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 05:25 PM

...And the little wheel frame thing on the left didnt seem to work either...


To the left of where?
I'm not sure what you're meaning by "little wheel frame thing".

Are you sure the upper/lower loops were set to the correct size before fitting the magazine to the camera?

I suppose another possibility is if the shutter is out of sync with the pulldown - but that would be a serious problem with the internals of the camera! - Easy enough to check with the magazine off and just turning the 'inching' dial though. Whilst you're doing that you can also confirm that the pull-down claw is moving properly, and the reg-pin also protrudes at the right time.

If the image is a blur down the film, then it must have meant the film wasn't stationary whilst the shutter was open.

If you draw a wiggly line down a length of film, then load it into the camera, you can remove the lens and look at the gate as you inch the camera round. The line should always be stationary whilst the shutter is open, but the line should be in a different position each time the shutter is open (having moved one frame on whilst the shutter was closed).
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#3 ben goldberg

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 06:12 PM

Yeah what i meant was the inching wheel. It seems as the pulldown claw was not working. I totally just **(obscenity removed)**ed up like 200ft of film and wasted over 300 dollars!!!

AHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks for the tip!
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 28 February 2010 - 08:36 PM

This sounds like a job for SUPER TECHNISCOPE MAN!!! You could have messed up 1,500 feet of 35mm for that $300.00. A bargain in the world of messing up.

I shot 2 200 footers recently for tests. I left the pressure plate out of the first 50' of the first roll. I wrapped the first 15' of the second roll in the head. I shot the last 1/4 of the second roll with the 85 filter on in night shots (tungsten roll). It had been so long since I had run a camera that I didn't run those critical check lists in my head and goofed because of it (I'm going to print the check lists out, have them laminated and put them in my DP case).

Not kidding. It is cheaper to screw-up in 2-perf.
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#5 Ian Cooper

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 04:24 AM

Yeah what i meant was the inching wheel. It seems as the pulldown claw was not working. I totally just **(obscenity removed)**ed up like 200ft of film and wasted over 300 dollars!!!

AHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks for the tip!


Ah, right.
Bit of a problem.

I'm not intimately aware of the internals of the camera, but I thought the inching dial engaged fairly low down the mechanism near to the motor coupling (silly question I know, but you did turn the 'inching engage' lever through 90 degrees before trying to turn the dial? If you don't do that then the inching dial doesn't engage.)

I suppose the other way of checking would be to turn the 4 buckles and slide the motor off the bottom. That way you're able to directly turn the motor coupling to see what's happening. Make sure the motor is in its "park" position and the shutter is aligned in the 'closed' position before you put the motor back on though (won't do any damage, but the camera will always stop with the shutter open if you don't!)

Edited by Ian Cooper, 01 March 2010 - 04:26 AM.

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#6 Jason Hinkle (RIP)

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 07:29 PM

hey ben, sorry about your footage. it sounds like it could be the timing needs adjusted. of course if you can visibly see the claw not working then obviously that is a problem. here's how to check your timing:
http://eclair16.com/...eck-the-timing/
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