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#1 Caroline Shimper

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 07:01 PM

Hi there,

I just recently saw the 'Just Like a Pill' video from many years ago and am wondering how they slid so seamlessly from one set to the next. Does anyone know who wouldn't mind explaining?

Many thanks,
Caroline
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#2 Kevin W Wilson

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 06:38 PM

They are 3D transitions. No different from the standard wipes and dissolves included with most NLE's. These look especially good though because of the symmetrical nature of the all the backgrounds and objects in the scenes. Notice there's not a lot of stuff on any complex angles. It's all very square and flat, this mostly comes down to planning ahead and having the art department and production design involved with the implementation of the look.

That's all it is though, very clean 3D transitions. They can be done in any compositing program. You would lay your shots down in 3D space, create a 3D camera and simply spin the camera around from shot to shot within that space. The zooms look to be done the same way; by just pushing in on the image in 3D space.

Here's similar video that uses the exact same principals:

This one uses a bit edgier approach, largely accomplished through the more energetic use of the camera. It has the same type of 3D transitions as the other video but also uses straight cuts that are disguised under the whip pans and tilts of the camera. The cut disappears in the motion blur created but the camera move. It's so seamless most folks don't even notice. Cool stuff, all hidden in plain view.
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#3 Caroline Shimper

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 08:10 AM

Thanks Kevin, that's really helpful. Nice video link as well. I'm shooting a video on the 5D Mark II but have noticed with anything like a whip pan that there is serious warping that occurs. Is there a way to avoid getting the warping that anyone knows of? Thanks again for your help Kevin!

Caroline

They are 3D transitions. No different from the standard wipes and dissolves included with most NLE's. These look especially good though because of the symmetrical nature of the all the backgrounds and objects in the scenes. Notice there's not a lot of stuff on any complex angles. It's all very square and flat, this mostly comes down to planning ahead and having the art department and production design involved with the implementation of the look.

That's all it is though, very clean 3D transitions. They can be done in any compositing program. You would lay your shots down in 3D space, create a 3D camera and simply spin the camera around from shot to shot within that space. The zooms look to be done the same way; by just pushing in on the image in 3D space.

Here's similar video that uses the exact same principals:

This one uses a bit edgier approach, largely accomplished through the more energetic use of the camera. It has the same type of 3D transitions as the other video but also uses straight cuts that are disguised under the whip pans and tilts of the camera. The cut disappears in the motion blur created but the camera move. It's so seamless most folks don't even notice. Cool stuff, all hidden in plain view.


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#4 Kevin W Wilson

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 03:52 PM

The warping effect you describe is known as a "rolling shutter." Also referred to as "jello cam." CMOS chip based cameras, like the 5dMkII, are susceptible to it because of the way they record images. CCD cameras are also capable of rolling shutter artifacts but not as much, smear tends to be a bigger issue.

Barry Green has a detailed article on it and there are lots of posts here, cinematography.com, on rolling shutter issues, just do a search and you'll turn up several posts on the subject. It's a common annoyance amongst DP's.

Barry Green Article: http://www.dvxuser.com/jason/CMOS-CCD/

The easiest way to avoid rolling shutter in whip pans is to not do them. Pan slowly or structure your shots so they don't use pans. Any vertical objects or lines in the frame will make the effect look worse than it is, so try to think about your blocking and shots to avoid these things.
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Wooden Camera

Glidecam

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

The Slider