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#1 Saba Mazloum

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 07:21 AM

Hey friends,

i recently took some Polaroid pics that are really precious to me, would like to know what would be the best way to preserve them .


Thanks
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#2 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 01:22 PM

My first query would be what Polaroid film type you have at hand?

Are we talking about packfilm ("peel-apart-film" for Type 100 cameras or converted rollfilm cameras like the Speedliners, Highlanders or Pathfinders), sheetfilm (4x5 large-format Type 50), or are we talking about integralfilm ("one-stop-film" that is used for Type SX-70 or 600 cameras with motorised ejection, the Polas with the white holding strip/pouch...)?

All of these Polaroids are best preserved in a photo-album style book, placed in the protective pockets or affixed with photo sticky corners and china paper between the pages. Stored upright, at below 70 degrees Fahrenheit and between 50% and 30% relative humidity.

Integralfilm is basically maintenance free. It ages very well. I have some 25 year old SX-70s which are only now slowly fading into more darkishness and increase in contrast.
Wipe off fingerprints or dirt using a soft cloth, rubbing on the image more cautiously than firmly.

Packfilm and Sheetfilm: Same here, mostly maintenance free. The oldest packfilm I have is nearly 40 years old B&W, and only now does the positive start to fade into white, with decreased contrast. And these were badly stored, not as I outlined above.
You can spray-apply a protective coating to these. Depending on where you life, a different brand and supplier offers these, and you should have no problem finding them in a professional-grade photo store. I have mixed results with these: once you applied them, you need to re-apply them on a regular basis (1-2 years), and the chemicals leave brownish marks on paper as it evaporates. Polaroids that were not coated in such a way do not age better or worse. So personally, I have ceased to apply this.
Some films, namely 665 or 55, leave you with a positive picture and an original negative, and require you to coat the positive after development. However, in this case coater was included in the box, so you probably did that already.

Generally, I would not worry too much. Polaroid as well as Fuji or Kodak positives age very well in the right home storage. It might well be that the lifetime of the pictures outlives your wish and will to treasure and preserve the image ;) .

Hope that helped a bit,

-Michael
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#3 Saba Mazloum

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 11:29 PM

Hey thanks a lot for the detailed reply! The film type is Fujifilm FP-3000b Panchromatic type, i used a mamya with Polaroid back on it.

My first query would be what Polaroid film type you have at hand?

Are we talking about packfilm ("peel-apart-film" for Type 100 cameras or converted rollfilm cameras like the Speedliners, Highlanders or Pathfinders), sheetfilm (4x5 large-format Type 50), or are we talking about integralfilm ("one-stop-film" that is used for Type SX-70 or 600 cameras with motorised ejection, the Polas with the white holding strip/pouch...)?

All of these Polaroids are best preserved in a photo-album style book, placed in the protective pockets or affixed with photo sticky corners and china paper between the pages. Stored upright, at below 70 degrees Fahrenheit and between 50% and 30% relative humidity.

Integralfilm is basically maintenance free. It ages very well. I have some 25 year old SX-70s which are only now slowly fading into more darkishness and increase in contrast.
Wipe off fingerprints or dirt using a soft cloth, rubbing on the image more cautiously than firmly.

Packfilm and Sheetfilm: Same here, mostly maintenance free. The oldest packfilm I have is nearly 40 years old B&W, and only now does the positive start to fade into white, with decreased contrast. And these were badly stored, not as I outlined above.
You can spray-apply a protective coating to these. Depending on where you life, a different brand and supplier offers these, and you should have no problem finding them in a professional-grade photo store. I have mixed results with these: once you applied them, you need to re-apply them on a regular basis (1-2 years), and the chemicals leave brownish marks on paper as it evaporates. Polaroids that were not coated in such a way do not age better or worse. So personally, I have ceased to apply this.
Some films, namely 665 or 55, leave you with a positive picture and an original negative, and require you to coat the positive after development. However, in this case coater was included in the box, so you probably did that already.

Generally, I would not worry too much. Polaroid as well as Fuji or Kodak positives age very well in the right home storage. It might well be that the lifetime of the pictures outlives your wish and will to treasure and preserve the image ;) .

Hope that helped a bit,

-Michael


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#4 Antti Näyhä

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 12:47 PM

I don't know the dimensions of the mentioned Fuji instant film, but here's a great archival-safe option for Polaroid 600 sized pictures:

http://www.printfile...ckageof100.aspx
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

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Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

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