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#1 Christopher Cafaro

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 08:38 PM

Hi all.

I have never used super 8 in my life. That being said,
I've seen some videos online of super 8 with a Kowa anamorphic lens.
I would love an anamorphic look for a music video I'm shooting but
i can't seem to find much information for super 8 anamorphic.

Anyone know of any places in the city that rent Kowa?

We will be shooting with the Beaulieu 9008, with 7219.

Also any tips for a super 8 newbie would be greatly appreciated
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#2 andy oliver

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 01:28 PM

Hi, fyi, once available was a isco-gottingen 10mm iscorama-cinegon f1.8 1.5x lens, look here http://www.cinematog...h...25830&st=20 scroll down to ''post 33''
The lens was a 10mm schneider cinegon, with the iscorama lens attached to the front, the two lens are one unit, so no support rods etc are required. The only downside is your stuck with the 10mm lens. These were available with the beaulieu LCU or as c-mount... They are also extremely rare....
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#3 Sean Lambrecht

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 10:57 PM

I'm not sure if Kowa anamorphic lenses were ever made for cameras. I believe they're all projector lenses. The rear thread size is a series 7 on the one I have, no front thread. You need to separately focus both the camera lens and the Kowa lens to the same distance. You'll probably need to zoom in considerably with the camera to get past the vignetting on the Kowa also. Getting the axis aligned correctly on the anamorphic can be tricky. I've used a smooth rubber ball evenly illuminated from all sides as a guide to get the alignment set.

Edit- I doubt anybody rents them, probably need to look on Ebay and buy one.
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#4 Oliver Christoph Kochs

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 10:39 AM

Yes, they were projection lenses only. On cameras they are limited to a close range of 1,5 meter and normal focal lengths (50mm equivalent 35mm still photography / fullframe sensor size).
i.e. That is a 25mm lens on a Bolex H16 or a Arri S and probaly a 13 on a Super 8 camera. That isn't very much wide angle and causes problems in interior shooting situations. Everything below causes vignetting.
The only Kowa lens in question should be the 16 H / 8Z (same same but different name) as it has the largest rear diameter. These go for $ 500 on ebay.
The Iscoramas were made for still photography and have a 1.5 squeeze. The front element of the ISCO is the best anamorphic solution for around $ 1000. A Iscorama 54 MC (multicoated) with a 54mm rear diameter and a close rage of 1.5 meter was the best one they had. I called up Schneider not a long time ago whether they still had any old stock they might want to sell but the guy said they have zero left.
So i'm saving all my money for this. Mohoahhh!!
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 02:57 PM

$500? No kidding! I've got one of those, mint condition- anyone?
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#6 Sean Lambrecht

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 08:26 AM

So I just happened along an interesting post on Deakin's site about Kowas: "...They were the lower budget option for Mitchell cameras... ...Joe Dunton has a set to rent in pl..."

And what do ya know, they're also the very last entry in post #1 of the anamorphic f.a.q. right here: http://www.cinematog...?showtopic=4690

Color me wrong! :rolleyes:

I still think the majority of the videos you've seen posted were shot most likely with the projector lenses however.
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#7 Mark Dunn

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 03:18 PM

I'm pretty sure that forum is talking about integral 'scope lenses and not attachments. The 8Z (or 16H, depending which side of the pond you are) is an attachment which doubles as the projector lens. It has to be focussed independently of the objective.
On the camera, it requires a rotating mount so that it can remain upright as the lens filter ring, to which it attaches, rotates, as most of them do. I glued a secondary distance scale to mine to help keep it true. The rear element is not particularly large so it vignettes at the short end of most zooms.
On the projector a Heath Robinson affair attached to the feed arm hangs it in front of the lens.
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#8 Damien Dubois

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 09:22 PM

That topic is in the nick of time !
I am selling my Kowa 8-z on the bay. You will be able to find it in typing kowa anamorphic on the bay. (I don't give the link as it is a kind of commercial).
It stays available till tuesday march 23.
I say it just to let you know, as it is a hard to find and very sought-after item those last few months with the widescreen mania increased by the DSLR movie makers.
They all want an anamorphic adapater, as it offers very impressive results. I was stunned by the beauty of some footage I watched on vimeo.
Anyway, I gave lots of informations about this lens on this board. If someone needs help don't hesitate to ask me.
I did not use mine at all as I filed the gate of my nizo camera in the same time. And to compare, it's far easier to use it compared to a rig with a rod support, a mattebox, a bracket for the kowa lens, the double focusing issue...
It's not the same thing, I know...

cheers

damian
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#9 steinzeug

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 07:52 AM

$500? No kidding! I've got one of those, mint condition- anyone?


still for sale?
i´m looking for one
steinzeug@telia.com
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#10 Justin Donoghue

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 03:09 AM

would the Kowa 8-z/16H be suitable for a Beaulieu ZM2. it's thread is 62mm and if I'm not mistaken the Kowa thread is 52mm so I'd need to step up but would I lose anything in that big of a step up?
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#11 Justin Miller

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 05:49 PM

I've got 3 of those. And camera mounts for them. I think. Maybe not. They've been in storage for a long time. :P

Anyone want one?

would the Kowa 8-z/16H be suitable for a Beaulieu ZM2. it's thread is 62mm and if I'm not mistaken the Kowa thread is 52mm so I'd need to step up but would I lose anything in that big of a step up?


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#12 Mark Dunn

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 03:59 AM

would the Kowa 8-z/16H be suitable for a Beaulieu ZM2. it's thread is 62mm and if I'm not mistaken the Kowa thread is 52mm so I'd need to step up but would I lose anything in that big of a step up?

A step-down such as that would probably vignette quite a bit.
I've still got my 8Z and mount, however. Please PM me if serious.
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#13 Christian Appelt

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 06:58 AM

If you want to use the Kowa 8Z lens on your camera, please note that it is not just a matter of finding the right step-up/down ring.

#1 - The weight of the Kowa 8Z may be a problem with C-mount cameras, at least when you use long zoom lenses. Don't know about video camera mounts, but make sure to get a decent support.

#2 - The 8Z always has to stay in the "oval upright" position, so if your spherical lenses front rotates, that's a problem. In the 1980s, someone did manufacture a rotating thread adapter, so even with rotating spherical lenses you could adjust the 8Z after focusing the base lens. Never saw one of these, maybe the know more at The Widescreen Centre.

BTW, Roger Deakins is referring to spherical Kowa lenses, not the anamorphic ones. IIRC Clairmont Camera used to rent Kowas, I think they were listed in a ~1992 AC ad.

More on mounting an 8Z:

cinematography.com thread

filmshooting.com thread

Edited by Christian Appelt, 10 September 2010 - 07:03 AM.

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#14 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 10:14 PM

Hi, I thought I'd interject some information regarding use of the KOWA 16-H/8-Z lens, since I have shot quite a bit using this lens in both still and movie formats. Hopefully this will shed some useful light on the topic.

---> The KOWA 16-H(8-Z) 2x compression anamorphic lens can produce extremely sharp and wonderful images, both for motion picture use and still photography. As with any optical system, observing the limitations and careful use will produce the best results. Yes, you'd think that adding on another set of optical surfaces to your main imaging lens would degrade the image, but that's not true in practice when you consider that TWICE the amount of visual information is being compressed into the horizontal axis. Care of use isn't any more than maintaining correct focus, and of course shading of the lens, just as one would with any compound lens such as large zooms.

---> But keep in mind here.....that 2x compression will yield a 2.66:1 aspect ratio, which is much too wide for HDTV which is 1.66:1. A 1.5x anamorphic would yield a closer working aspect ratio, if you prefer to have a full HD screen image, with less cropping. Otherwise, you're going to end up with a "letterbox" effect, even in the HD format! Unless the wider aspect ratio is preferred for the subject matter being filmed.

---> Anamorphic lenses have their drawbacks, and the most obvious one is that there is a practical focal length "cut-off" point for the backing or main lens. With the KOWA 16-H, {depending on what type of main/prime lens to A-lens separation you have due to step-up/down rings}, the widest focal length you can use on most Super 8mm cameras is somewhere around 15mm. This will translate into a practical effective focal length of about 7.5mm wide angle on the horizontal axis. So you will still be gaining more than you would if the prime lens were at 15mm in shooting at 1.33:1 ratio (4:3). For most short range zoom Super 8mm cameras, those with zooms up to about 5x/6x, the usable wide end range will fall somewhere in the 15mm to 20mm range.

---> Using large zoom Super 8mm cameras, such as the BEAULIEU Schneider 6mm-66mm or NIZO S-800(etc) the useable range will fall somewhere around 40mm, owing to their lens construction. An exception here is using the earlier 8mm-64mm F/1.9 Angenieux lens, which is small and will work better with the KOWA 16-H lens. But, for shooting in Widescreen for telephoto only or super telephoto, this works fine.

---> The best way to support the anamorphic lens (A-lens for short) is via a professional type compendium type adapter such as one made some years ago by Animex in Europe, and by EWA, or the fine rigs made by Les Rechter in Australia (member of the AWA - Australian Widescreen Association), and also the "lollipop" type adapters made by various companies and individuals and those easy to use ones made by the WIDESCREEN Centre in England (especially their former Custome Mount and Custome Mount Deluxe units). In all these attachments, the full weight of the A-lens is supported by the bracket, which is nominally attached to the camera's tripod socket via a Base Block with a bolt, or on some cameras supported from the top via an optional socket made or intended for optional movie lights or microphones (e.g. NIZO 6056/6080 and similar cameras). The main advantage to using any of these units, especially an easy to use and design lollipop holder, is that the A-lens is fixed in the correct orientation and you won't have to reset it again after focusing, as with Filter Thread only type Adapters. There will occasionally be some slight tweeking necessary depending how you're using the setup. I have an add-on Filter Attachment for the front of my KOWA 16-H (and a vendor on eBay also is selling these recently), allowing for use of 72mm Filters and addon lenes. I also find that using 52mm filters in between the camera's zoom lens and the A-lens works great also; e.g. using my SANKYO XL-620 Supertronic camera (and others).

---> One potentially frustrating aspect in using the KOWA initially is that BOTH the Prime/Main lens AND the A-lens must be focused. At first this can be bothersome...but only to those that just want to shoot wildly with minimal preparation. It can be done pretty quickly; as you approximate the distance setting first on the A-lens, then zoom in with your Prime Lens and focus critcally, noting the distance and then fine tune the A-lens, either visually or via the distance scale or both. With some practice, it works quite well. Using fixed focus cameras, such as the CHINON Pocket-8, QUARZ Super 8 with zoom lens removed and others, you only need to adjust focus on the A-lens. I suppose it might even be possible on some setups to fit a focus synch rod to adjust both lenses at the same time; but they would have to have similar scale range movements for this to work.

---> Single lens focusing simplicity was one of the main advantages of the ISCORAMA 1.5x compression lenses, as you can leave the Prime/Main lens set to Infinity, and just focus the A-lens. Mind you, this applies only to the true ISCORAMA System lenses, as they did make some others that don't work this way. One of later ones that comes to mind is the ISCORAMA 54 (that big fat HUGE lens) and some others. Another easy way is using any of the monoblock type design lenses which do not focus, such as the HYPERGONAR 8 which is a 1.75x CinemaScope lens (many have used this to insert into films shot in 1.5x and 2x compression since it's a middle A-lens format). And there are many other smaller and earlier 1.5x lenses such as the YaschicaScope, ElmoScope, KinoScope etc. KOWA also made lenses similar to the 16-H under other names, yet the practical application is virtually the same: Sankor, Bell & Howell, Eiki are some names it was badged with. Aside from some small physical differences, they are the same lens.

---> Lastly, while a bit cheeky, A-lenses also have been used for nightmare sequences and other hallucinagenic effects whereby the lens is rotated around or side to side for an unbalancing effect. Hunting down the adapters these days is a bit more difficult, but they are often in the hands of many older filmmakers, and can be found in for sale sections of club magazines, or sometimes simply via a request from any of the websites for cine clubs to ask members if they have any to sell. If not, it means getting a machine shop to custom make something up for you, and this can be expensive.

---> Finally, to see a full 2.66:1 Anamorphic Super 8mm film projected is just amazing! I have had some of my films projected on 24ft wide and 28ft wide screens using ELMO GS-1200 projectors, both Xenon and Halogen versions, just breathtaking. I also have seen an excellent full length war epic shot in Regular 8mm CinemaScope using a BOLEX P-4 or similar camera, all done with sound in post, complete with costumed armies and aerial filming.....truly remarkable work. The technical limitations of the formats notwithstanding, it's all in the storytelling, the cinematic expression of the dream and ideas that makes the film.

There's more I could go into, but this is long enough to read thru,
best regards, Martin Baumgarten
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#15 Domi

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 07:11 AM

Hi, I thought I'd interject some information regarding use of the KOWA 16-H/8-Z lens, since I have shot quite a bit using this lens in both still and movie formats. Hopefully this will shed some useful light on the topic.

---> The KOWA 16-H(8-Z) 2x compression anamorphic lens can produce extremely sharp and wonderful images, both for motion picture use and still photography. As with any optical system, observing the limitations and careful use will produce the best results. Yes, you'd think that adding on another set of optical surfaces to your main imaging lens would degrade the image, but that's not true in practice when you consider that TWICE the amount of visual information is being compressed into the horizontal axis. Care of use isn't any more than maintaining correct focus, and of course shading of the lens, just as one would with any compound lens such as large zooms.

---> But keep in mind here.....that 2x compression will yield a 2.66:1 aspect ratio, which is much too wide for HDTV which is 1.66:1. A 1.5x anamorphic would yield a closer working aspect ratio, if you prefer to have a full HD screen image, with less cropping. Otherwise, you're going to end up with a "letterbox" effect, even in the HD format! Unless the wider aspect ratio is preferred for the subject matter being filmed.

---> Anamorphic lenses have their drawbacks, and the most obvious one is that there is a practical focal length "cut-off" point for the backing or main lens. With the KOWA 16-H, {depending on what type of main/prime lens to A-lens separation you have due to step-up/down rings}, the widest focal length you can use on most Super 8mm cameras is somewhere around 15mm. This will translate into a practical effective focal length of about 7.5mm wide angle on the horizontal axis. So you will still be gaining more than you would if the prime lens were at 15mm in shooting at 1.33:1 ratio (4:3). For most short range zoom Super 8mm cameras, those with zooms up to about 5x/6x, the usable wide end range will fall somewhere in the 15mm to 20mm range.

---> Using large zoom Super 8mm cameras, such as the BEAULIEU Schneider 6mm-66mm or NIZO S-800(etc) the useable range will fall somewhere around 40mm, owing to their lens construction. An exception here is using the earlier 8mm-64mm F/1.9 Angenieux lens, which is small and will work better with the KOWA 16-H lens. But, for shooting in Widescreen for telephoto only or super telephoto, this works fine.

---> The best way to support the anamorphic lens (A-lens for short) is via a professional type compendium type adapter such as one made some years ago by Animex in Europe, and by EWA, or the fine rigs made by Les Rechter in Australia (member of the AWA - Australian Widescreen Association), and also the "lollipop" type adapters made by various companies and individuals and those easy to use ones made by the WIDESCREEN Centre in England (especially their former Custome Mount and Custome Mount Deluxe units). In all these attachments, the full weight of the A-lens is supported by the bracket, which is nominally attached to the camera's tripod socket via a Base Block with a bolt, or on some cameras supported from the top via an optional socket made or intended for optional movie lights or microphones (e.g. NIZO 6056/6080 and similar cameras). The main advantage to using any of these units, especially an easy to use and design lollipop holder, is that the A-lens is fixed in the correct orientation and you won't have to reset it again after focusing, as with Filter Thread only type Adapters. There will occasionally be some slight tweeking necessary depending how you're using the setup. I have an add-on Filter Attachment for the front of my KOWA 16-H (and a vendor on eBay also is selling these recently), allowing for use of 72mm Filters and addon lenes. I also find that using 52mm filters in between the camera's zoom lens and the A-lens works great also; e.g. using my SANKYO XL-620 Supertronic camera (and others).

---> One potentially frustrating aspect in using the KOWA initially is that BOTH the Prime/Main lens AND the A-lens must be focused. At first this can be bothersome...but only to those that just want to shoot wildly with minimal preparation. It can be done pretty quickly; as you approximate the distance setting first on the A-lens, then zoom in with your Prime Lens and focus critcally, noting the distance and then fine tune the A-lens, either visually or via the distance scale or both. With some practice, it works quite well. Using fixed focus cameras, such as the CHINON Pocket-8, QUARZ Super 8 with zoom lens removed and others, you only need to adjust focus on the A-lens. I suppose it might even be possible on some setups to fit a focus synch rod to adjust both lenses at the same time; but they would have to have similar scale range movements for this to work.

---> Single lens focusing simplicity was one of the main advantages of the ISCORAMA 1.5x compression lenses, as you can leave the Prime/Main lens set to Infinity, and just focus the A-lens. Mind you, this applies only to the true ISCORAMA System lenses, as they did make some others that don't work this way. One of later ones that comes to mind is the ISCORAMA 54 (that big fat HUGE lens) and some others. Another easy way is using any of the monoblock type design lenses which do not focus, such as the HYPERGONAR 8 which is a 1.75x CinemaScope lens (many have used this to insert into films shot in 1.5x and 2x compression since it's a middle A-lens format). And there are many other smaller and earlier 1.5x lenses such as the YaschicaScope, ElmoScope, KinoScope etc. KOWA also made lenses similar to the 16-H under other names, yet the practical application is virtually the same: Sankor, Bell & Howell, Eiki are some names it was badged with. Aside from some small physical differences, they are the same lens.

---> Lastly, while a bit cheeky, A-lenses also have been used for nightmare sequences and other hallucinagenic effects whereby the lens is rotated around or side to side for an unbalancing effect. Hunting down the adapters these days is a bit more difficult, but they are often in the hands of many older filmmakers, and can be found in for sale sections of club magazines, or sometimes simply via a request from any of the websites for cine clubs to ask members if they have any to sell. If not, it means getting a machine shop to custom make something up for you, and this can be expensive.

---> Finally, to see a full 2.66:1 Anamorphic Super 8mm film projected is just amazing! I have had some of my films projected on 24ft wide and 28ft wide screens using ELMO GS-1200 projectors, both Xenon and Halogen versions, just breathtaking. I also have seen an excellent full length war epic shot in Regular 8mm CinemaScope using a BOLEX P-4 or similar camera, all done with sound in post, complete with costumed armies and aerial filming.....truly remarkable work. The technical limitations of the formats notwithstanding, it's all in the storytelling, the cinematic expression of the dream and ideas that makes the film.

There's more I could go into, but this is long enough to read thru,
best regards, Martin Baumgarten



We all agree, buying an ISCO is now insane. What about the HYPERGONAR?

Any Cons and Pros from experts in the house?

/Do
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#16 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 01:24 AM

We all agree, buying an ISCO is now insane. What about the HYPERGONAR?

Any Cons and Pros from experts in the house?

/Do

The HYPERGONAR lenses, are quite small and were made to work with smaller primes than the zoom lenses we're all used to on most Super 8mm cameras. The two small lenses, HYPERGONAR 8 and 16, were intended for those respective formats, since they would allow full coverage on the "normal" focal length lenses. That being said, an A-lens will work with most any lens that it can physically match. As for the larger HYPERGONAR lenses, they are either way too long (as in the case of the 35mm cinema projection units)or are just plain huge and heavy, making them not easy to work with. Also, they don't show up all that often on eBay or in other cine sales arenas these days. Back in the day, The WIDESCREEN CENTRE in London used to export many of them to India since they are perhaps the country where most of the CinemaScope type films have been made.

There are lots of A-lenses in the hands of enthusiasts that for whatever reason don't use them, are too old now to bother with filming, or just love seeing them collect dust. With the loss of so many cine clubs worldwide, most of it due to upcoming generations not being club joiners for a variety of reasons......the venues for members or former club members to sell off these lenses has been drying up. I recommend that anyone interested in obtaining any equipment, as well as A-lenses, to contact any remaining film clubs to see if anyone is willing to sell. It's that, or pay outrageous prices at industry suppliers' shops, or wait until something shows up on eBay or other online auction sites with photographic wares sections. I'm sorry, but my tiny HYPERGONAR-8 lens I'm keeping....works great on most fixed lens small Super 8s, or small prime lenses. Those tiny FUJI P-2 Single-8 cameras or the tiny CHINON Pocket 8 with this lens, really makes for a pocketable CinemaScope filming rig!
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#17 Miles Heckendorn

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 05:47 AM

Hi, I thought I'd interject some information regarding use of the KOWA 16-H/8-Z lens, since I have shot quite a bit using this lens in both still and movie formats. Hopefully this will shed some useful light on the topic...........


Fantastic information, thank you.
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#18 daniel mahlknecht

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 11:14 AM

I have a set of iscoramas, and I do also rent them and my 8mm cameras (not if shipping is required).
But usually only, if I work at least in a camera assistant position as well (if this lenses get broken its not easy to replace them).
to see the available gear see my homepage: www.dapalmerfilm.com/databasesystem/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=4&id=26&Itemid=42
to see an iscorama example shot with my cameras see:
and


daniel
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#19 Carl Looper

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 07:18 PM

I've been running the numbers on the difference between using a Kowa (2.0X) A lens, vs cropping, and these are my results.

When targeting HDTV do not use a Kowa 2X lens. It is significantly less efficient use of film area than if simple cropping was used. And furthermore, a 1.5X lens offers little more than 1% improvement over simple cropping.

If you want to target the 1.85:1 or 2.39:1 standards, the Kowa 2.0X will offer significant improvement over simple cropping, but not as much improvement as using a 1.5X A lens.


Notes.

The usable area of a Super8 frame (which we treat as 100% use) is:

5.79mm x 4.01mm = 23.2179 sqr mm.

Targeting 16:9

A Lens Used Area of film (more = better) Percentage of film used
------ --------------------------------- -----------------------
Crop: 5.79mm x 3.257mm = 18.858 sqr mm 81%
1.5X: 4.753mm x 4.01mm = 19.1 sqr mm 82%
2.0X: 3.565mm x 4.01mm = 14.296 sqr mm 62%

Targeting 1.85 : 1

A Lens Used Area of film (more = better) Percentage of film used
------ --------------------------------- -----------------------
Crop: 5.79mm x 3.13mm = 18.12 sqr mm 78%
1.5X: 4.95mm x 4.01mm = 19.8 sqr mm 85%
2.0X: 3.71mm x 4.01mm = 14.87 sqr mm 64%

Targeting 2.39 : 1

A Lens Used Area of film (more = better) Percentage of film used
------ --------------------------------- -----------------------
Crop: 5.79mm x 2.423mm = 14.0 sqr mm 60%
1.5X: 5.79mm x 3.639mm = 21.0 sqr mm 91%
2.0X: 4.792mm x 4.01mm = 19.2 sqr mm 83%

Carl
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#20 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 12:35 PM

Those carefully worked out format and transfer and resolution details are terrific in showing the practically application of the Super 8 format. And I have to thank you for this great attention to detail, as it will help many wishing to shoot for the HD 16:9 format ratio.

This is only relative to the 16:9 HD aspect ratio, and only IF as filmmakers, you accept 'that' aspect ratio as the standard to aspire to. My own way of looking at all this is, shoot in the aspect ratio that you wish to best express your film story or artistic rendering in. You'll often note that even Cinematic releases when they go to DVD or Blu-Ray will still very often be in the original aspect ratio they were filmed in. Thus.....even with this so-called new standard of Television, viewers will still have black masking bars on the top and bottom of the image in order to yield the correct aspect ratio of the original production.

Many still like to project their films, and rightly so, even the film competitions are projected. By projection, I don't mean only in film, since even that isn't convenient or practical, thus the use of Digital Projection. And via Digital Projection, the original aspect ratio can be maintained on the screen, with minimal adjustment of the masking black side curtains to always show each aspect ratio at its best. So, I think in the end, all other considerations aside and notwithstanding, having fomented your ideas for your film project's end presentation......decide what aspect ratio your film will be in and work around that. Even the accepted film industry standard of 1.85:1 aspect ratio for non-anamorphic or other WIDESCREEN releases....is still wider than our now forced upon us all HDTV 16:9 system. So to show them correctly, as envisioned by their DPs is to show them masked with top and bottom black bars even on the HDTV, unless you watch them cropped down.

I recall watching an excellent epic presentation, on a 24 foot WideScreen, while living in England some years back, "The Battle of Britain" shot in full CinemaScope, across a couple continents to get all the aerial work & costumed recreators in.....with 4-track post synched sound and dialog on reel-to-reel.....and it was all filmed in REGULAR 8mm! It was a perfect example of how professional a film can be made, with a large host of actors, props, professional filmmaking technique, and yet, all done on the tiniest of film gauges. What a shame it would be to have to visually crop down such a production IF it was supposed to fill the 16:9 HD screen. For my two cents here, consider all the ramifications, costs, and technical considerations, and work in whatever aspect ratio you feel best conveys the not only the storyline, but the FEEL of the production you want to make.

In the end, you can film in Super 8's normal aspect ratio, but allowing more breathing room in your composition, if planning to crop the final image to fit into a wider presentation ratio in the video release.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera